Monthly Archives: March 2016

Leadership

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Today in History – March 28

1774 – Britain passed the Coercive Act against Massachusetts.

1797 – Nathaniel Briggs patented a washing machine.

1834 – The U.S. Senate voted to censure President Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States.

1854 – The Crimean War began with Britain and France declaring war on Russia.

1864 – A group of Copperheads attack Federal soldiers in Charleston, IL. Five were killed and twenty were wounded.

1865 – Outdoor advertising legislation was enacted in New York. The law banned “painting on stones, rocks and trees.”

1885 – The Salvation Army was officially organized in the U.S.

1898 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a child born in the U.S. to Chinese immigrants was a U.S. citizen. This meant that they could not be deported under the Chinese Exclusion Act.

1903 – Anatole France’s “Crainquebille” premiered in Paris.

1905 – The U.S. took full control over Dominican revenues.

1908 – Automobile owners lobbied the U.S. Congress, supporting a bill that called for vehicle licensing and federal registration.

1910 – The first seaplane took off from water at Martinques, France. The pilot was Henri Fabre.

1911 – In New York, suffragists performed the political play “Pageant of Protest.”

1917 – During World War I the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was founded.

1921 – U.S. President Warren Harding named William Howard Taft as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court.

1922 – Bradley A. Fiske patented a microfilm reading device.

1930 – Constantinople and Angora changed their names to Istanbul and Ankara respectively.

1933 – In Germany, the Nazis ordered a ban on all Jews in businesses, professions and schools.

1938 – In Italy, psychiatrists demonstrated the use of electric-shock therapy for treatment of certain mental illnesses.

1939 – The Spanish Civil War ended as Madrid fell to Francisco Franco.

1941 – The Italian fleet was defeated by the British at the Battle of Matapan.

1942 – British naval forces raided the Nazi occupied French port of St. Nazaire.

1945 – Germany launched the last of the V-2 rockets against England.

1947 – The American Helicopter Society revealed a flying device that could be strapped to a person’s body.

1962 – The U.S. Air Force announced research into the use of lasers to intercept missiles and satellites.

1963 – Sonny Werblin announced that the New York Titans of the American Football League was changing its name to the New York Jets. (NFL)

1967 – Raymond Burr starred in a TV movie titled “Ironside.” The movie was later turned into a television series.

1968 – The U.S. lost its first F-111 aircraft in Vietnam when it vanished while on a combat mission. North Vietnam claimed that they had shot it down.

1974 – A streaker ran onto the set of “The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson.”

1979 – A major accident occurred at Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. A nuclear power reactor overheated and suffered a partial meltdown.

1981 – In Bangkok, Thailand, Indonesian terrorists hijacked an airplane. Four of the five terrorists were killed on March 31.

1986 – The U.S. Senate passed $100 million aid package for the Nicaraguan contras.

1986 – More than 6,000 radio stations of all format varieties played “We are the World” simultaneously at 10:15 a.m. EST.

1990 – Jesse Owens received the Congressional Gold Medal from U.S. President George H.W. Bush.

1990 – In Britain, a joint Anglo-U.S. “sting” operation ended with the seizure of 40 capacitors, which can be used in the trigger mechanism of a nuclear weapon.

1991 – The U.S. embassy in Moscow was severely damaged by fire.

1994 – Violence between Zulus and African National Congress supporters took the lives of 18 in Johannesburg.

1999 – Paraguay’s President Raúl Cubas Grau resigned after protests inspired by the assassination of Vice-President Luis María Argaña on March 23. The nation’s Congress had accused Cubas and his political associate, Gen. Lino César Oviedo, for Cubas’ murder. Senate President Luis González Macchi took office as Paraguay’s new chief executive.

2002 – The exhibit “The Italians: Three Centuries of Italian Art” opened at the National Gallery of Australia.

2010 – China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co. signed a deal to buy Ford Motor Co.’s Volvo car unit.


Today in History – March 24

1379 – The Gelderse war ended.

1545 – German Parliament opened in Worms.

1550 – France and England signed the Peace of Boulogne.

1629 – The first game law was passed in the American colonies, by Virginia.

1664 – A charter to colonize Rhode Island was granted to Roger Williams in London.

1720 – In Paris, banking houses closed due to financial crisis.

1765 – Britain passed the Quartering Act that required the American colonies to house 10,000 British troops in public and private buildings.

1792 – Benjamin West became the first American artist to be selected president of the Royal Academy of London.

1828 – The Philadelphia & Columbia Railway was authorized as the first state owned railway.

1832 – Mormon Joseph Smith was beaten, tarred and feathered in Ohio.

1837 – Canada gave blacks the right to vote

1848 – A state of siege was proclaimed in Amsterdam.

1868 – Metropolitan Life Insurance Company was formed.

1878 – The British frigate Eurydice sank killing 300.

1880 – The first “hail insurance company” was incorporated in Connecticut. It was known as Tobacco Growers’ Mutual Insurance Company.

1882 – In Berlin, German scientist Robert Koch announced the discovery of the tuberculosis germ (bacillus).

1883 – The first telephone call between New York and Chicago took place.

1900 – Mayor Van Wyck of New York broke the ground for the New York subway tunnel that would link Manhattan and Brooklyn.

1900 – In New Jersey, the Carnegie Steel Corporation was formed.

1904 – Vice Adm. Tojo sank seven Russian ships as the Japanese strengthened their blockade of Port Arthur.

1905 – In Crete, a group led by Eleutherios Venizelos claimed independence from Turkey.

1906 – In Mexico, the Tehuantepec Istmian Railroad opened as a rival to the Panama Canal.

1906 – The “Census of the British Empire” revealed that England ruled 1/5 of the world.

1911 – In Denmark, penal code reform abolished corporal punishment.

1920 – The first U.S. coast guard air station was established at Morehead City, NC.

1924 – Greece became a republic.

1927 – Chinese Communists seized Nanking and break with Chiang Kai-shek over the Nationalist goals.

1932 – Belle Baker hosted a radio variety show from a moving train. It was the first radio broadcast from a train.

1934 – U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt signed a bill granting future independence to the Philippines.

1938 – The U.S. asked that all powers help refugees fleeing from the Nazis.

1944 – In Rome, The Gestapo rounded up innocent Italians and shot them to death in response to a bomb attack that killed 32 German policemen. Over 300 civilians were executed.

1946 – The Soviet Union announced that it was withdrawing its troops from Iran.

1947 – The U.S. Congress proposed the limitation of the presidency to two terms.

1954 – Britain opened trade talks with Hungary.

1955 – Tennessee Williams’ play “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” debuted on Broadway.

1955 – The first oil drill seagoing rig was put into service.

1960 – A U.S. appeals court ruled that the novel, “Lady Chatterly’s Lover”, was not obscene and could be sent through the mail.

1972 – Great Britain imposed direct rule over Northern Ireland.

1976 – The president of Argentina, Isabel Peron, was deposed by her country’s military.

1980 – In San Salvador, Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero was shot to death by gunmen as he celebrated Mass.

1980 – “Nightline” with Ted Koppel premiered.

1982 – Soviet leader Leonid L. Brezhnev stated that Russia was willing to resume border talks with China.

1985 – Thousands demonstrated in Madrid against the NATO presence in Spain.

1988 – Former national security aides Oliver L. North and John M. Poindexter and businessmen Richard V. Secord and Albert Hakim pled innocent to Iran-Contra charges.

1989 – The Exxon Valdez spilled 240,000 barrels (11 million gallons) of oil in Alaska’s Prince William Sound after it ran aground.

1989 – The U.S. decided to send humanitarian aid to the Contras.

1990 – Indian troops left Sri Lanka.

1991 – The African nation of Benin held its first presidential elections in about 30 years.

1993 – In Israel, Ezer Weizman, an advocate of peace with neighboring Arab nations, was elected President.

1995 – Russian forces surrounded Achkoi-Martan. It was one of the few remaining strongholds of rebels in Chechenia.

1995 – The U.S. House of Representatives passed a welfare reform package that made the most changes in social programs since the New Deal.

1997 – The Australian parliament overturned the world’s first and only euthanasia law.

1998 – In Jonesboro, AR, two young boys open fire at students from woods near a school. Four students and a teacher were killed and 10 others were injured. The two boys were 11 and 13 years old cousins.

1998 – A former FBI agent said papers found in James Earl Ray’s car supports a conspiracy theory in the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

1999 – In Kenya, at least 31 people were killed when a passenger train derailed. Hundreds were injured.

1999 – NATO launched air strikes against Yugoslavia (Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo and Vojvodina). The attacks marked the first time in its 50-year history that NATO attacked a sovereign country. The bombings were in response to Serbia’s refusal to sign a peace treaty with ethnic Albanians who were seeking independence for the province of Kosovo.

1999 – The 7-mile tunnel under Mont Blanc in France was an inferno after a truck carrying flour and margarine caught on fire. At least 30 people were killed.

2001 – Apple Computer Inc’s operating system MAC OS X went on sale.

2002 – Thieves stole five 17th century paintings from the Frans Hals Museum in the Dutch city of Haarlem. The paintings were worth about $2.6 million. The paintings were works by Jan Steen, Cornelis Bega, Adriaan van Ostade and Cornelis Dusart.

2005 – The government of Kyrgyzstan collapsed after opposition protesters took over President Askar Akayev’s presidential compound and government offices.

2005 – Sandra Bullock received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

2006 – In Spain, the Basque separatist group ETA announced a permanent cease-fire.

2014 – It was announced that the U.S. and its allies would exclude Russia from the G8 meeting and boycott a planned summit in Sochi in response to Russia’s takeover of Crimea.


Today in History – March 21

1349 – 3,000 Jews were killed in Black Death riots in Efurt Germany.

1556 – Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.

1788 – Almost the entire city of New Orleans, LA, was destroyed by fire. 856 buildings were destroyed.

1790 – Thomas Jefferson reported to U.S. President George Washington as the new secretary of state.

1804 – The French civil code, the Code Napoleon, was adopted.

1824 – A fire at a Cairo ammunitions dump killed 4,000 horses.

1826 – The Rensselaer School in Troy, NY, was incorporated. The school became known as Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and was the first engineering college in the U.S.

1835 – Charles Darwin & Mariano Gonzales met at Portillo Pass.

1851 – Emperor Tu Duc ordered that Christian priests be put to death.

1851 – Yosemite Valley was discovered in California.

1857 – An earthquake hit Tokyo killing about 107,000.

1858 – British forces in India lift the siege of Lucknow, ending the Indian Mutiny.

1859 – In Philadelphia, the first Zoological Society was incorporated.

1868 – The Sorosos club for professional women was formed in New York City by Jennie June. It was the first of its kind.

1871 – Journalist Henry M Stanley began his famous expedition to Africa.

1902 – Romain Roland’s play “The 4th of July” premiered in Paris.

1902 – In New York, three Park Avenue mansions were destroyed when a subway tunnel roof caved in.

1904 – The British Parliament vetoed a proposal to send Chinese workers to Transvaal.

1905 – Sterilization legislation was passed in the State of Pennsylvania. The governor vetoed the measure.

1906 – Ohio passed a law that prohibited hazing by fraternities after two fatalities.

1907 – The U.S. Marines landed in Honduras to protect American interests in the war with Nicaragua.

1907 – The first Parliament of Transvaal met in Pretoria.

1908 – A passenger was carried in a bi-plane for the first time by Henri Farman of France.

1909 – Russia withdrew its support for Serbia and recognized the Austrian annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serbia accepted Austrian control over Bosnia-Herzegovina on March 31, 1909.

1910 – The U.S. Senate granted ex-President Teddy Roosevelt a yearly pension of $10,000.

1918 – During World War I, the Germans launched the Somme Offensive.

1925 – The state of Tennessee enacted the Butler Act. It was a law that made it a crime for a teacher in any state-supported public school to teach any theory that was in contradiction to the Bible’s account of man’s creation.

1928 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge gave the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh for his first trans-Atlantic flight.

1934 – A fire destroyed Hakodate, Japan, killing about 1,500.

1935 – Incubator ambulance service began in Chicago, IL.

1941 – The last Italian post in East Libya, North Africa, fell to the British.

1945 – During World War II, Allied bombers began four days of raids over Germany.

1946 – The Los Angeles Rams signed Kenny Washington. Washington was the first black player to join a National Football League team since 1933.

1946 – The United Nations set up a temporary headquarters at Hunter College in New York City.

1953 – The Boston Celtics beat Syracuse Nationals (111-105) in four overtimes to eliminate them from the Eastern Division Semifinals. A total of seven players (both teams combined) fouled out of the game.

1955 – NBC-TV presented the first “Colgate Comedy Hour”.

1957 – Shirley Booth made her TV acting debut in “The Hostess with the Mostest” on CBS.

1960 – About 70 people were killed in Sharpeville, South Africa, when police fired upon demonstrators.

1963 – Alcatraz Island, the federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay, CA, closed.

1965 – The U.S. launched Ranger 9. It was the last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.

1965 – More than 3,000 civil rights demonstrators led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. began a march from Selma to Montgomery, AL.

1966 – In New York, demolition work began to clear thirteen square blocks for the construction of the original World Trade Center.

1971 – Two U.S. platoons in Vietnam refused their orders to advance.

1972 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states could not require one year of residency for voting eligibility.

1974 – An attempt was made to kidnap Princess Anne in London’s Pall Mall.

1980 – U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced to the U.S. Olympic Team that they would not participate in the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow as a boycott against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1980 – On the TV show “Dallas”, J.R. Ewing was shot.

1982 – The movie “Annie” premiered.

1982 – The United States, U.K. and other Western countries condemned the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1984 – A Soviet submarine crashed into the USS Kitty Hawk off the coast of Japan.

1985 – Larry Flynt offered to sell his pornography empire for $26 million or “Hustler” magazine alone for $18 million.

1985 – Police in Langa, South Africa, opened fire on blacks marching to mark the 25th anniversary of the Sharpeville shootings. At least 21 demonstrators were killed.

1989 – Randall Dale Adams was released from a Texas prison after his conviction was overturned. The documentary “The Thin Blue Line” had challenged evidence of Adams’ conviction for killing a police officer.

1990 – “Normal Life” with Moon Unit & Dweezil Zappa premiered on CBS-TV.

1990 – Australian businessman Alan Bond sold Van Gogh’s “Irises” to the Gerry Museum. Bond had purchased the painting for $53.9 million in 1987.

1990 – “Sydney” starring Valerie Bertinelli premiered on CBS-TV.

1990 – Namibia became independent of South Africa.

1991 – 27 people were lost at sea when two U.S. Navy anti-submarine planes collided.

1991 – The U.N. Security Council lifted the food embargo against Iraq.

1994 – Dudley Moore was arrested for hitting his girlfriend.

1994 – Steven Spielberg won his first Oscars. They were for best picture and best director for “Schindler’s List.”

1994 – Wayne Gretzky tied Gordie Howe’s NHL record of 801 goals.

1994 – Bill Gates of Microsoft and Craig McCaw of McCaw Cellular Communications announced a $9 billion plan that would send 840 satellites into orbit to relay information around the globe.

1995 – New Jersey officially dedicated the Howard Stern Rest Area along Route 295.

1995 – Tokyo police raided the headquarters of Aum Shinrikyo in search of evidence to link the cult to the Sarin gas released on five Tokyo subway trains.

1999 – Israel’s Supreme Court rejected the final effort to have American Samuel Sheinbein returned to the U.S. to face murder charges for killing Alfred Tello, Jr. Under a plea bargain Sheinbein was sentenced to 24 years in prison.

2000 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had overstepped its regulatory authority when it attempted to restrict the marketing of cigarettes to youngsters.

2001 – Nintendo released Game Boy Advance.

2002 – In Pakistan, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh was charged with murder for his role in the kidnapping of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pear. Three other Islamic militants that were in custody were also charged along with seven more accomplices that were still at large.

2002 – In Paris, an 1825 print by French inventor Joseph Nicephore Niepce was sold for $443,220. The print, of a man leading a horse, was the earliest recorded image taken by photographic means.

2003 – It was reported that the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up 235.27 (2.8%) at 8,521.97. It was the strongest weekly gain in more than 20 years.


Trump and Hillary, Unprincipled and Undignified

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I still have an inkling my prediction 6 months ago may come true:
Biden/Warren vs Cruz/Jindal-Rubio-Fiorina-Haley or Carson.

So, here we go………..

One has never needed to ask forgiveness, the other one says she has never lied.

Hillary and Trump each have more people who despise them than like them.

A party that is smart and serious enough to defeat Trump is not one that would nominate Hillary.

With Trump versus Hillary, you can tell which party has more integrity by how many vow not to vote for their nominee.

The Trump people say they’re against the establishment, but the establishment are more likely to rally around Trump than conservatives.

Movie Pitch: Somehow, the two most unlikeable people in the country end up as the two presidential candidates. And then they fall in love.

You can call the Repub debates a clown show, but you’re as bad as a Trump voter if you try to pretend the #DemDebate is smart and reasonable.

Dems are going to have trouble attacking Trump on anything and not being seen as hypocritical b/c he’s a fun house mirror version of them.

And…. there’s a very good chance that Hillary will face an FBI indictment and Donald Trump will testify in a class-action lawsuit against Trump University. Out of 330 million people in the USA and we’re narrowing our choices between these 2?

h/t for some – witmaster Frank J. at IMAO

 


Spring Break 2016 – The Grand Canyon

Spring Break 2016, Grand Canyon- We conquered Camelback Mtn a few times, parts of Superstition Mtns, Squaw Peak, South Mtn and we were called into the belly of the beast: The Grand Canyon! Wow, what a treat! Spectacular, gorgeous, stunning, just a magnificent work of God’s art. Probably could’ve taken more photo’s but thinking 1 misstep would send me down 1,000 feet 😱 All day hike was amazing and a bit tough. Daniella’s legs are made of rubber, she has no bones, she just flew on the way up. Derrek’s insight into the new Captain America movie in May was awesome as well as all things The Hobbit and BatMan. Great time!

From the top of the canyon….
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Just the 3 of us this time, with Daniella and Derrek right after we finished up the all day hike into the Grand Canyon

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Don’t tip to the left!

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Pretty tired here…….

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Derrek, the coolest kid you’d ever meet!

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Named this critter “Pony”…as in “hey man, can’t you pony up some food for a lil’ squirrel like me?”

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Bringing in supplies…

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Down near the creek

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D&D just before we set out. A little chilly, about 43 degrees.

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Today in History – March 16

1521 – Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan reached the Philippines. He was killed the next month by natives.

1527 – The Emperor Babur defeated the Rajputs at the Battle of Kanvaha in India.

1621 – Samoset walked into the settlement of Plymouth Colony, later Plymouth, MA. Samoset was a native from the Monhegan tribe in Maine who spoke English.

1802 – The U.S. Congress established the West Point Military Academy in New York.

1836 – The Republic of Texas approved a constitution.

1850 – The novel “The Scarlet Letter,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, was published for the first time.

1871 – The State of Delaware enacted the first fertilizer law.

1882 – The U.S. Senate approved a treaty allowing the United States to join the Red Cross.

1883 – Susan Hayhurst graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. She was the first woman pharmacy graduate.

1907 – The world’s largest cruiser, the British Invincible was completed at Glasgow.

1908 – China released the Japanese steamship Tatsu Maru.

1909 – Cuba suffered its first revolt only six weeks after the inauguration of Gomez.

1913 – The 15,000-ton battleship Pennsylvania was launched at Newport News, VA.

1915 – The Federal Trade Commission began operation.

1917 – Russian Czar Nicholas II abdicated his throne.

1918 – Tallulah Bankhead made her New York acting debut with a role in “The Squab Farm.”

1926 – Physicist Robert H. Goddard launched the first liquid-fuel rocket.

1928 – The U.S. planned to send 1,000 more Marines to Nicaragua.

1935 – Adolf Hitler ordered a German rearmament and violated the Versailles Treaty.

1939 – Germany occupied the rest of Czechoslovakia.

1945 – Iwo Jima was declared secure by the Allies. However, small pockets of Japanese resistance still existed.

1946 – Algerian nationalist leader Ferhat Abbas was freed after spending a year in jail.

1946 – India called British Premier Attlee’s independence off contradictory and a propaganda move.

1947 – Martial law was withdrawn in Tel Aviv.

1950 – Congress voted to remove federal taxes on oleomargarine.

1964 – Paul Hornung and Alex Karras were reinstated to the NFL after an 11-month suspension for betting on football games.

1964 – U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson submitted a $1 billion war on poverty program to Congress.

1968 – U.S. troops in Vietnam destroyed a village consisting mostly of women and children. The event is known as the My-Lai massacre.

1978 – Italian politician Aldo Moro was kidnapped by left-wing urban guerrillas. Moro was later murdered by the group.

1982 – Russia announced they would halt their deployment of new nuclear missiles in Western Europe.

1984 – Mozambique and South Africa signed a pact banning the support for one another’s internal enemies.

1984 – William Buckley, the CIA station chief in Beirut, was kidnapped by gunmen. He died while in captivity.

1985 – “A Chorus Line” played its 4,000 performance.

1985 – Terry Anderson, an Associated Press newsman, was taken hostage in Beirut. He was released in December 4, 1991.

1987 – “Bostonia” magazine printed an English translation of Albert Einstein’s last high school report card.

1988 – Indictments were issued for Lt. Colonel Oliver North, Vice Admiral John Poindexter of the National Security Council, and two others for their involvement in the Iran-Contra affair.

1988 – Mickey Thompson and his wife Trudy were shot to death in their driveway. Thompson, known as the “Speed King,” set nearly 500 auto speed endurance records including being the first person to travel more than 400 mph on land.

1989 – In the U.S.S.R., the Central Committee approved Gorbachev’s agrarian reform plan.

1989 – The Soviet Communist Party’s Central Committee approved large-scale agricultural reforms and elected the party’s 100 members to the Congress of People’s Deputies.

1993 – In France, ostrich meat was officially declared fit for human consumption.

1994 – Tonya Harding pled guilty in Portland, OR, to conspiracy to hinder prosecution for covering up the attack on her skating rival Nancy Kerrigan. She was fined $100,000. She was also banned from amateur figure skating.

1994 – Russia agreed to phase out production of weapons-grade plutonium.

1995 – NASA astronaut Norman Thagard became the first American to visit the Russian space station Mir.

1998 – Rwanda began mass trials for 1994 genocide with 125,000 suspects for 500,000 murders.

1999 – The 20 members of the European Union’s European Commission announced their resignations amid allegations of corruption and financial mismanagement.