Monthly Archives: September 2015

Today in History – September 24

1789 – The U.S. Congress passed the First Judiciary Act. The act provided for an Attorney General and a lower federal courts.

1869 – Thousands of businessmen were financially ruined after a panic on Wall Street. The panic was caused by an attempt to corner the gold market by Jay Gould and James Fisk.

1915 – “The Lamb,” Douglas Fairbanks first film, was shown at the Knickerbocker Theater in New York City, NY.

1929 – The first all-instrument flight took place in New York when Lt. James H. Doolittle guided a Consolidated NY2 Biplane over Mitchell Field.

1933 – “Roses and Drums” was heard on WABC in New York City. It was the first dramatic presentation for radio.

1934 – Babe Ruth played his last game as a New York Yankee player.

1938 – Don Budge became the first tennis player to win all four of the major titles when he won the U.S. Tennis Open. He had already won the Australian Open, the French Open and the British Open.

1955 – U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower suffered a heart attack while on vacation in Denver, CO.

1957 – The Brooklyn Dodgers played their last game at Ebbets Field.

1957 – U.S. President Eisenhower sent federal troops to Little Rock, AR, to enforce school integration.

1960 – The first nuclear powered aircraft carrier was launched. The USS Enterprise set out from Newport News, VA.

1961 – “The Bullwinkle Show” premiered in prime time on NBC-TV. The show was originally on ABC in the afternoon as “Rocky and His Friends.”

1963 – The U.S. Senate ratified a treaty that limited nuclear testing. The treaty was between the U.S., Britain, and the Soviet Union.

1968 – “60 Minutes” premiered on CBS-TV.

1968 – “The Mod Squad” premiered on ABC-TV.

1977 – “The Love Boat” debuted on ABC-TV. The theme song was sung by Jack Jones and was written by Paul Williams and Charles Fox.

1995 – Three decades of Israeli occupation of West Bank cities ended with the signing of a pact by Israel and the PLO.

1996 – The United States, represented by President Clinton, and the world’s other major nuclear powers signed a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to end all testing and development of nuclear weapons.

1998 – The U.S. Federal Reserve released into circulation $2 billion in new harder-to-counterfeit $20 bills.

2001 – U.S. President George W. Bush froze the assets of 27 suspected terrorists and terrorist groups.

2003 – Anthony Hopkins received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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Why a Practicing Muslim Cannot Become POTUS –

Quran vs. Constitution: Why they’re incompatible

President Barack Obama stated in Cairo, Egypt, June 4, 2009: “When the first Muslim American was recently elected to Congress, he took the oath to defend our Constitution using the … Holy Quran.”

The dilemma is: How can one swear to defend something upon a book that promotes the opposite?

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution states that Congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise of religion, yet the Quran states in Sura 4:89, “Those who reject Islam must be killed. If they turn back (from Islam), take hold of them and kill them wherever you find them.”

In Hadith Sahih al-Bukhari (Vol. 9, Book 84, No. 57), Muhammad said: “Whoever changes his Islamic religion, kill him.”

Islamic law relegates non-Muslims to “dhimmi” status, where they are not to propagate their customs amongst Muslims and cannot display a Cross or a Star of David.

The First Amendment states Congress shall not abridge “the freedom of speech,” yet Islamic law enforces dhimmi status on non-Muslims, prohibiting them from observing their religious practices publicly, raising their voices during prayer or ringing church bells.

The First Amendment states Congress cannot take away “the right of the people to peaceably assemble,” yet Islamic law states non-Muslims cannot build any new places of worship or repair any old places Muslims have destroyed; they must allow Muslims to participate in their private meetings; they cannot bring their dead near the graveyards of Muslims or mourn their dead loudly.

The First Amendment states Congress cannot take away the right of the people “to petition the Government for a redress of grievances,” yet Islamic law states non-Muslims are not to harbor any hostility toward the Islamic state or give comfort to those who disagree with Islamic government.

The Second Amendment states, “The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed,” yet Islamic law states non-Muslims cannot possess arms, swords or weapons of any kind.

The Third Amendment states one cannot be forced to “quarter” someone in their house, yet Islamic law states non-Muslims must entertain and feed for three days any Muslim who wants to stay in their home, and for a longer period if the Muslim falls ill – and they cannot prevent Muslim travelers from staying in their places of worship.

The Fourth Amendment guarantees “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures,” yet Islamic law states if a non-Muslim rides on a horse with a saddle and bridle, the horse can be taken away.

The Fifth Amendment states that “no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime … without due process of law,” yet Muhammad said, “No Muslim should be killed for killing a Kafir (infidel)” (Hadith Sahih al-Bukhari, Vol. 9, No. 50).

The Sixth Amendment guarantees a “public trial by an impartial jury” and the Seventh Amendment states “the right of trial by jury shall be preserved,” yet Islamic law does not give non-Muslims equal legal standing with Muslims, even prohibiting a non-Muslim from testifying in court against a Muslim.

The Eighth Amendment states there shall be no “cruel and unusual punishments inflicted,” yet the Quran states:

“Cut off the hands of thieves, whether they are male or female, as punishment for what they have done – a deterrent from Allah” (Sura 5:38).

A raped woman is punished: “The woman and the man guilty of adultery or fornication – flog each of them with a hundred stripes” (Sura 24:2).

Women can be beaten: “If you experience rebellion from the women, you shall first talk to them, then (you may use negative incentives like) deserting them in bed, then you may (as a last alternative) beat them” (Sura 4:34).

Honor killings of wives and daughters who have embarrassed their families have been reported by the United Nations in Muslim populations of Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Yemen and increasing in Western nations.

The 13th Amendment states there shall be no “slavery or involuntary servitude,” yet the Quran accommodates slavery as Muhammad owned slaves.

The 14th Amendment guarantees citizens “equal protection of the laws,” yet the Quran does not consider Jews, Christians and other non-Muslims as equal to Muslims before the law.

Referring to Jews as “the People of the Book,” Muhammad said: “They are those whom Allah has cursed; who have been under his wrath; some of whom were turned into apes and swine” (Sura 5:60, 7:166, 2:65).

The 15th Amendment guarantees “the right of the citizens … to vote shall not be denied … on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude,” yet the fundamentalist interpretation of Islamic law does not allow voting, as democracy is considered people setting themselves in the place of Allah by making their own laws.

The 16th Amendment has some similarities with Islamic law, as “Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes from whatever source derived.” Muhammad said, “Fight those who believe not in Allah … until they pay the jizya [tax] with willing submission, and feel themselves subdued” (Sura 9:29).

The 18th Amendment has some similarities with Islamic law, as “the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors … for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.”

The 19th Amendment allows women to vote, yet in strict Islamic countries women cannot vote.

The 21st Amendment allows for the sale of liquor, yet Islamic law prohibits non-Muslims from selling or drinking wine and liquor openly.
One would assume that to swear upon a book implies believing what is in that book.

As Muhammad was not just a religious leader, but also a political and military leader, Islam is not just a religious system, but also a political and military system.

Since no one has the authority to demand Muslims worldwide cease imitating the political/military example of Muhammad, when Muslims bow in prayer they are also pledging political/military allegiance to Mecca.

Swearing to defend the U.S. Constitution upon a Quran that promotes different values is a dilemma worthy of a presidential explanation.

 

h/t  William Federer. – http://www.wnd.com/2009/09/111055/#OrxL51xmOl9dJTHh.99


Today in History – September 21

1792 – The French National Convention voted to abolish the monarchy.

1784 – “The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser” was published for the first time in Philadelphia. It was the first daily paper in America.

1893 – Frank Duryea took what is believed to be the first gasoline- powered automobile for a test drive. The “horseless carriage” was designed by Frank and Charles Duryea.

1897 – The New York Sun ran the “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus” editorial. It was in response to a letter from 8-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon.

1931 – Britain went off the gold standard.

1931 – Japanese forces began occupying China’s northeast territory of Manchuria.

1937 – J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” was first published.

1941 – “The Second Mrs. Burton” premiered to the entire CBS Radio Network.

1948 – Milton Berle debuted as the host of “The Texaco Star Theater” on NBC-TV. The show later became “The Milton Berle Show.” Berle was the regular host until 1967.

1948 – “Life With Luigi” debuted on CBS Radio.

1949 – Communist leaders proclaimed The People’s Republic of China.

1957 – “Perry Mason”, the television series, made its debut on CBS-TV. The show was on for 9 years.

1961 – Antonio Abertondo swam the English Channel (in both directions) in 24 hours and 25 minutes.

1964 – Malta gained independence from Britain.

1966 – The Soviet probe Zond 5 returned to Earth. The spacecraft completed the first unmanned round-trip flight to the moon.

1970 – “NFL Monday Night Football” made its debut on ABC-TV. The game was between the Cleveland Browns and the New York Jets. The Browns won 31-21.

1973 – Henry Kissinger was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become 56th Secretary of State. He was the first naturalized citizen to hold the office of Secretary of State.

1981 – The U.S. Senate confirmed Sandra Day O’Connor to be the first female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

1981 – Belize gained full independence from Great Britain.

1982 – National Football League (NFL) players began a 57-day strike. It was their first regular-season walkout.

1982 – Amin Gemayel was elected president of Lebanon. He was the brother of Bashir Gemayel who was the president-elect when he was assassinated.

1984 – General Motors and the United Auto Workers union reached an agreement that would end the previous six days of spot strikes.

1985 – North and South Korea opened their borders for their family reunion program.

1993 – Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced that he was ousting the Communist-dominated Congress. The action was effectively seizing all state power.

1996 – The board of all-male Virginia Military Institute voted to admit women.

1996 – John F. Kennedy Jr. married Carolyn Bessette in a secret ceremony on Cumberland Island, GA.


Today in History – September 20

1519 – Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan left Spain to find a route to the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Magellan was killed during the trip, but one of his ships eventually made the journey.

1870 – The Papal States came under the control of Italian troops, leading to the unification of Italy.

1881 – Chester A. Arthur became the 21st president of the U.S. President James A. Garfield had died the day before.

1884 – The Equal Rights Party was formed in San Francisco, CA.

1921 – KDKA in Pittsburgh, PA, started a daily radio newscast. It was one of the first in the U.S.

1946 – The first Cannes Film Festival premiered. The original premier was delayed in 1939 due to World War II.

1946 – WNBT-TV in New York became the first station to promote a motion picture. Scenes from “The Jolson Story” were shown.

1953 – The TV show “Letter to Loretta” premiered. The name was changed to “The Loretta Young Show” on February 14, 1954.

1953 – Jimmy Stewart debuted on the radio western “The Six Shooter” on NBC.

1955 – “You’ll Never Be Rich” premiered on CBS-TV. The name was changed less than two months later to “The Phil Silvers Show.”

1962 – James Meredith, a black student, was blocked from enrolling at the University of Mississippi by Governor Ross R. Barnett. Meredith was later admitted.

1963 – U.S. President John F. Kennedy proposed a joint U.S.-Soviet expedition to the moon in a speech to the U.N. General Assembly.

1967 – The ocean liner Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) was launched. It went out of service on November 27, 2008.

1977 – The first of the “boat people” arrived in San Francisco from Southeast Asia under a new U.S. resettlement program.

1982 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan announced that the U.S., France, and Italy were going to send peacekeeping troops back to Beirut.

1984 – “The Cosby Show” premiered on NBC-TV.

1988 – The United Nations opened it 43rd General Assembly.

1989 – F.W. de Klerk was sworn in as president of South Africa.

1991 – U.N. weapons inspectors left for Iraq in a renewed search for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.

1992 – French voters approved the Maastricht Treaty.

1995 – AT&T announced that it would be splitting into three companies. The three companies were AT&T, Lucent Technologies, and NCR Corp.

1995 – The U.S. House of Representatives voted to drop the national speed limit. This allowed the states to decide their own speed limits.

2013 – Apple released the iPhone 5s.

Today’s: Famous Birthdays – Music history


10 Stories That Prove Gurkhas Are the Fiercest Fighters on the Planet

 

Some Gurkhas were going to be part of an airdrop operation. The guy briefing their CO was describing the fact that they would be jumping from the aircraft onto the objective from a height of 500 feet. The Gurkha said “OK, but that seems a little high”. The other officer said “High? That’s so low we won’t even give you reserve parachutes because they wouldn’t have time to open.” The Gurkha said “Parachutes? “

 

10 Stories That Prove Gurkhas Are the Fiercest Fighters on the Planet.

 


Today in History – September 19

1356 – The Battle of Poitiers was fought between England and France. Edward “the Black Prince” captured France’s King John.

1777 – The Battle of Saratoga was won by American soldiers during the Revolutionary War.

1796 – U.S. President Washington’s farewell address was published.

1819 – John Keats wrote “Ode to Autumn.”

1876 – Melville R. Bissell patented the carpet sweeper.

1891 – “The Merchant of Venice” was performed for the first time at Manchester.

1893 – In New Zealand, the Electoral Act 1893 was consented to giving all women in New Zealand the right to vote.

1942 – The first advertisement to announce Little Golden Books appeared in Publishers Weekly.

1955 – Eva Marie Saint, Frank Sinatra and Paul Newman starred in the “Producer’s Showcase” presentation of “Our Town” on NBC-TV.

1955 – Argentina President Juan Peron was ousted after a revolt by the army and navy.

1957 – The U.S. conducted its first underground nuclear test. The test took place in the Nevada desert.

1959 – Nikita Khruschev was not allowed to visit Disneyland due to security reasons. Khrushchev reacted angrily.

1960 – Cuban leader Fidel Castro, in New York to visit the United Nations, checked out of the Shelburne Hotel angrily after a dispute with the management.

1970 – “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” premiered on CBS-TV.

1982 – Scott Fahlman became the first person to use 🙂 in an online message.

1983 – Lebanese army units defending Souk el-Gharb were supported in their effort by two U.S. Navy ships off Beirut.

1984 – China and Britain completed a draft agreement transferring Hong Kong from British to Chinese rule by 1997.

1986 – U.S. health officials announced that AZT, though an experimental drug, would be made available to AIDS patients.

1988 – Israel successfully launched the Horizon-I test satellite.

1990 – Iraq began confiscating foreign assets of countries that were imposing sanctions against the Iraqi government.

1992 – The U.N. Security Council recommended suspending Yugoslavia due to its role in the Bosnian civil war.

1994 – U.S. troops entered Haiti peacefully to enforce the return of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

1995 – The U.S. Senate passed a welfare overhaul bill.

1995 – The commander of American forces in Japan and the U.S. ambassador apologized for the rape of a schoolgirl committed by three U.S. servicemen.

1996 – The government of Guatemala and leftist rebels signed a peace treaty to end their long war.

2002 – In Ivory Coast, around 750 rebel soldiers attempted to overthrow the government. U.S. troops landed on September 25th to help move foreigners, including Americans, to safer areas.

2003 – It was reported that AOL Time Warner was going to drop “AOL” from its name and be known as Time Warner Inc. The company had announced its merger and name change on January 10, 2000.

2014 – The Apple iPhone 6 went on sale.


Today in History – September 14

1807 – Former U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr was acquitted of a misdemeanor charge. Two weeks earlier Burr had been found innocent of treason.

1812 – Moscow was set on fire by Russians after Napoleon Bonaparte’s troops invaded.

1814 – Francis Scott Key wrote the “Star-Spangled Banner,” a poem originally known as “Defense of Fort McHenry,” after witnessing the British bombardment of Fort McHenry, MD, during the War of 1812. The song became the official U.S. national anthem on March 3, 1931.

1847 – U.S. forces took control of Mexico City under the leadership of General Winfield Scott.

1866 – George K. Anderson patented the typewriter ribbon.

1899 – In New York City, Henry Bliss became the first automobile fatality.

1901 – U.S. President William McKinley died of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt, at age 42, succeeded him.

1915 – Carl G. Muench received a patent for Insulit, the first sound-absorbing material to be used in buildings.

1938 – The VS-300 made its first flight. The craft was based on the helicopter technology patented by Igor Sikorsky.

1940 – The Selective Service Act was passed by the U.S. Congress providing the first peacetime draft in the United States.

1948 – In New York, a groundbreaking ceremony took place at the site of the United Nations’ world headquarters.

1959 – Luna II, a Soviet space probe, became the first man-made object on the moon when it crashed on the surface.

1960 – The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded. The core members were Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela.

1963 – Mary Ann Fischer gave birth to America’s first surviving quintuplets.

1965 – “My Mother The Car” premiered on NBC TV. The series was canceled after only a few weeks after the debut.

1972 – “The Waltons” premiered on CBS-TV.

1975 – Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton the first U.S.-born saint.

1978 – “Mork & Mindy” premiered on ABC-TV.

1983 – The U.S. House of Representatives voted 416-0 in a resolution condemning the Soviet Union for the shooting down of a Korean jet on September 1.

1984 – Joe Kittinger became the first person to fly a balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

1987 – Tony Magnuson cleared 9.5 feet above the top of the U-ramp and set a new skateboard high jump record.

1989 – Joseph T. Wesbecker shot and killed eight people and wounded twelve others at a printing plant in Louisville, KY. Wesbecker, 47 years old, was on disability for mental illness. He took his own life after the incident.

1994 – It was announced that the season was over for the National Baseball League on the 34th day of the players strike. The final days of the regular season were canceled.

1998 – Jaime Jarrin received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

1998 – Israel announced that they had successfully tested its Arrow-2 missile defense system. The system successfully destroyed a simulated target.

1999 – Disney World closed down for the first time in its 28-year history. The closure was due to Hurricane Floyd heading for Florida.
Disney movies, music and books

1999 – It was announced that “US” magazine would change from monthly to weekly and change its name to “USWeekly.”

2001 – Nintendo released the GameCube home video game console in Japan.

2001 – The FBI released the names of the 19 suspected hijackers that had taken part in the September 11 terror attacks on the U.S.

2009 – Greyhound UK began operations as an hourly service between London and Portsmouth or Southampton.