Monthly Archives: August 2015

The Clintons

billHillary

Hillary has finally gotten around to condemning her husband.

Daniel Greenfield  has assembled a gem….. Remember When Bill Clinton was Putting Illegal Aliens on “Boxcars“?

Remembering President Bill Clinton:

“We won’t tolerate immigration by people whose first act is to break the law as they enter our country. We must continue to do everything we can to strengthen our borders, enforce our laws, and remove illegal aliens from our country.

As I said in my State of the Union Address, we are a nation of immigrants, but we’re also a nation of laws. And it is wrong and ultimately self-defeating for a nation of immigrants to permit the kind of abuse of our immigration laws we have seen in recent years.

This week, I sent strong legislation to Congress to try to stop those abuses, to secure our borders in the future, and to speed up deportation of illegal immigrants.”

And listen to this Trumpe-esque position:

“Now, let me talk a little bit about increasing deportations. Our plan will triple the number of criminal and other deportable aliens deported since 1993. We want to focus on the criminal population or on those who are charged with crimes but who are here illegally. Every day, illegal aliens show up in court who are charged. Some are guilty, and surely, some are innocent. Some go to jail, and some don’t. But they’re all illegal aliens, and whether they’re innocent or guilty of the crime they’re charged with in court, they’re still here illegally and they should be sent out of the country.

If they’re sentenced to jail, they should go to jail. But then after their term is over, they should be removed from the United States. And when there is a plea bargain, I want deportation to be part of the deal.”

The left’s mastery of “I was for it before I was against it” mantra continues on.

 

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Today in History – August 30

1146 – European leaders outlawed the crossbow.

1645 – American Indians and the Dutch made a peace treaty at New Amsterdam. New Amsterdam later became known as New York.

1682 – William Penn sailed from England and later established the colony of Pennsylvania in America.

1780 – General Benedict Arnold secretly promised to surrender the West Point fort to the British army.

1806 – New York City’s second daily newspaper, the “Daily Advertiser,” was published for the last time.

1809 – Charles Doolittle Walcott first discovered fossils near Burgess Pass. He named the site Burgess Shale after nearby Mt. Burgess.

1862 – The Confederates defeated Union forces at the second Battle of Bull Run in Manassas, VA.

1905 – Ty Cobb made his major league batting debut with the Detroit Tigers.

1928 – The Independence of India League was established in India.

1941 – During World War II, the Nazis severed the last railroad link between Leningrad and the rest of the Soviet Union.

1945 – General Douglas MacArthur set up Allied occupation headquarters in Japan.

1951 – The Philippines and the United States signed a defense pact.

1956 – In Louisianna, the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway opened.

1960 – A partial blockade was imposed on West Berlin by East Germany.

1963 – The “Hotline” between Moscow and Washington, DC, went into operation.

1965 – Thurgood Marshall was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a Supreme Court justice. Marshall was the first black justice to sit on the Supreme Court.

1982 – P.L.O. leader Yasir Arafat left Beirut for Greece.

1983 – The space shuttle Challenger blasted off with Guion S. Bluford Jr. aboard. He was the first black American to travel in space.

1984 – The space shuttle Discovery lifted off for the first time. On the voyage three communications satellites were deployed.

1984 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan, and several others, were inducted into the Sportscasters Hall of Fame.

1991 – The Soviet republic of Azerbaijan declared its independence.

1993 – On CBS-TV “The Late Show with David Letterman” premiered.

1994 – Rosa Parks was robbed and beaten by Joseph Skipper. Parks was known for her refusal to give up her seat on a bus in 1955, which sparked the civil rights movement.

1994 – The largest U.S. defense contractor was created when the Lockheed and Martin Marietta corporations agreed to a merger.

1996 – An expedition to raise part of the Titanic failed when the nylon lines being used to raise part of the hull snapped.

1999 – The residents of East Timor overwhelmingly voted for independence from Indonesia. The U.N. announced the result on September 4.

2002 – Conoco Inc. and Phillips Petroleum merged to create ConocoPhillips. The new company was the third largest integrated energy company and the second largest refining company in the U.S.


Today in History – August 28

1609 – Delaware Bay was discovered by Henry Hudson.

1619 – Ferdinand II was elected Holy Roman Emperor. His policy of “One church, one king” was his way of trying to outlaw Protestantism.

1774 – The first American-born saint was born in New York City. Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton was canonized in 1975.

1811 – Percy Bysshe Shelley and Harriet Westbrook eloped.

1830 – “The Tom Thumb” was demonstrated in Baltimore, MD. It was the first passenger-carrying train of its kind to be built in America.

1833 – Slavery was banned by the British Parliament throughout the British Empire.

1907 – “American Messenger Company” was started by two teenagers, Jim Casey and Claude Ryan. The company’s name was later changedto “United Parcel Service.”

1916 – Italy’s declaration of war against Germany took effect duringWorld War I.

1917 – Ten suffragists were arrested as they picketed the White House.

1922 – The first radio commercial aired on WEAF in New York City. The Queensboro Realty Company bought 10 minutes of time for$100.

1922 – The Walker Cup was held for the first time at Southampton, NY. It is the oldest international team golf match in America.

1939 – The first successful flight of a jet-propelled airplane took place. The plane was a German Heinkel He 178.

1941 – The Football Writers Association of America was organized.

1963 – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his “I Have a Dream” speech at a civil rights rally in Washington, DC. More than 200,000 people attended.

1972 – Mark Spitz captured the first of his seven gold medals at the Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany. He set a world record when he completed the 200-meter butterfly in 2 minutes and 7/10ths of a second.

1981 – “The New York Daily News” published its final afternoon edition.

1990 – Iraq declared Kuwait to be its 19th province and renamed Kuwait City al-Kadhima.

1995 – The biggest bank in the U.S. was created when Chase Manhattan and Chemical Bank announced their $10 billion deal.

1996 – A divorce decree was issued for Britain’s Charles and Princess Diana. This was the official end to the 15-year marriage.

1998 – The Pakistani prime minister created new Islamic order and legal system based on the Koran.

2004 – George Brunstad, at age 70, became the oldest person to swim the English Channel. The swim from Dover, England, to Sangatte, France, took 15 hours and 59 minutes.

2008 – In China, the Shanghai World Financial Center officially opened. The observation decks opened on August 30.

2014 – Google announced its Project Wing. The project was aimed at delivering products across a city using unmanned flying vehicles.


Today in History – August 27

1660 – The books of John Milton were burned in London due to his attacks on King Charles II.

1789 – The Declaration of the Rights of Man was adopted by the French National Assembly.

1828 – Uruguay was formally proclaimed to be independent during preliminary talks between Brazil and Argentina.

1858 – The first cabled news dispatch was sent and was published by “The New York Sun” newspaper. The story was about the peace demands of England and France being met by China.

1859 – The first oil well was successfully drilled in the U.S. by Colonel Edwin L. Drake near Titusville, PA.

1889 – Charles G. Conn received a patent for the metal clarinet.

1889 – Boxer Jack “Nonpareil” Dempsey was defeated for the first time of his career by George LaBlanche.

1892 – The original Metropolitan Opera House in New York was seriously damaged by fire.

1894 – The Wilson-Gorman Tariff Act was passed by the U.S. Congress. The provision within for a graduated income tax was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.

1921 – The owner of Acme Packing Company bought a pro football team for Green Bay, WI. J.E. Clair paid tribute to those who worked in his plant by naming the team the Green Bay Packers. (NFL)

1928 – The Kellogg-Briand Pact was signed by 15 countries in Paris. Later, 47 other nations would sign the pact.

1938 – Robert Frost, in a fit of jealousy, set fire to some papers to disrupt a poetry recital by another poet, Archibald MacLeish.

1939 – Nazi Germany demanded the Polish corridor and Danzig.

1945 – American troops landed in Japan after the surrender of the Japanese government at the end of World War II.

1962 – Mariner 2 was launched by the United States. In December of the same year the spacecraft flew past Venus. It was the first space probe to reach the vicinity of another planet.

1972 – North Vietnam’s major port at Haiphong saw the first bombings from U.S. warplanes.

1981 – Work began on recovering a safe from the Andrea Doria. The Andrea Doria was a luxury liner that had sank in 1956 in the waters off of Massachusetts.

1984 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan announced that the first citizen to go into space would be a teacher. The teacher that was eventually chosen was Christa McAuliffe. She died in the Challenger disaster on January 28, 1986.

1984 – Diane Sawyer became the fifth reporter on CBS-TV’s “60 Minutes.”

1984 – The Menetta Lane Theatre in Greenwich Village opened. It was the first new off-Broadway theater to be built in 50 years in New York City.

1985 – The Space Shuttle Discovery left for a seven-day mission in which three satellites were launched and another was repaired and redeployed.

1986 – Nolan Ryan (Houston Astros) earned his 250th career win against the Chicago Cubs.

1989 – The first U.S. commercial satellite rocket was launched. A British communications satellite was onboard.

1990 – The U.S. State Department ordered the expulsion of 36 Iraqi diplomats.

1991 – The Soviet republic of Moldavia declared its independence.

1996 – California Governor Pete Wilson signed an order that would halt state benefits to illegal immigrants.

1998 – James Brolin received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

1998 – “Titanic” became the first movie in North America to earn more than $600 million.

1999 – The final crew of the Russian space station Mir departed the station to return to Earth. Russia was forced to abandon Mir for financial reasons.

2001 – The U.S. military announced that an Air Force RQ-1B “Predator” aircraft was lost over Iraq. It was reported that the unmanned aircraft “may have crashed or been shot down.”

2001 – Work began on the future site of a World War II memorial on the U.S. capital’s historic national Mall. The site is between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial.


Today in History – August 26

55 B.C. – Britain was invaded by Roman forces under Julius Caesar.

1498 – Michelangelo was commissioned to make the “Pieta.”

1842 – The first fiscal year was established by the U.S. Congress to start on July 1st.

1847 – Liberia was proclaimed as an independent republic.

1873 – The school board of St. Louis, MO, authorized the first U.S. public kindergarten.

1896 – In the Philippines, and insurrection began against the Spanish government.

1920 – The 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution went into effect. The amendment prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in the voting booth.

1934 – Adolf Hitler demanded that France turn over their Saar region to Germany.

1937 – All Chinese shipping was blockaded by Japan.

1939 – The first televised major league baseball games were shown. The event was a double-header between the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1939 – The radio program, “Arch Oboler’s Plays”, presented the NBC Symphony for the first time.

1945 – The Japanese were given surrender instructions on the U.S. battleship Missouri at the end of World War II.

1947 – Don Bankhead became the first black pitcher in major league baseball.

1957 – It was announced that an intercontinental ballistic missile was successfully tested by the Soviet Union.

1957 – The first Edsel made by the Ford Motor Company rolled of the assembly line.

1961 – The International Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto opened.

1973 – A U.S. Presidential Proclamation was declared that made August 26th Women’s Equality Day.

1978 – Sigmund Jahn blasted off aboard the Russian Soyuz 31 and became the first German in space.

1981 – The U.S. claimed that North Korea fired an antiaircraft missile at a U.S. Surveillance plane while it was over South Korea.

1987 – The Fuller Brush Company announced plans to open two retail stores in Dallas, TX. The company that had sold its products door to door for 81 years.

1990 – The 55 Americans at the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait left Baghdad by car and headed for the Turkish border.

1991 – Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev promised that national elections would be held.

1992 – A “no-fly zone” was imposed on the southern 1/3 of Iraq. The move by the U.S., France and Britain was aimed at protecting Iraqi Shiite Muslims.

1998 – The U.S. government announced that they were investigating Microsoft in an attempt to discover if they “bullied” Intel into delaying new technology.


Prediction

My 2 cents worth in this far too early 2016 Presidential race.
Prediction:
Biden/Warren vs ?/Fiorina

Now there’s a helluva cat fight in the works!

Hillary is over. Far, far too many improprieties, untrustworthy and to get right down to it, she’s out of touch with old ideas (not that Biden is any different, but there you have the current Dem party). President Obama will do whatever he can to ensure his legacy won’t be derailed by a Hillary presidency, will highly encourage the gaffe riddled Uncle Joe to run. Though very doubtful, wouldn’t count out John Kerry as VP. Who else is there except the self proclaimed American Indian, Elizabeth Warren? Democrat party = old white people.

? = Walker, Cruz or Rubio. IMO, Trump will fade, something from his past will derail him. Not that I want him to, just a gut feeling.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are similar players for their respective party. Trump is preventing the right from moving left and people are digging that. Bernie Sanders is moving the left further left, the media is letting that slide thereby making his self proclaimed Socialist ideology more “mainstream”. He might make a cool grandpa, but there’s no way on earth he’s going to become leader of the free world.

Walker has got the total package but needs Cruz’s tenacity, great accomplishments in a blue state. Cruz, no doubt the most intellectual on both sides and labeled by liberal Harvard law professorAlan Dershowitz as “off the charts brilliant”…http://www.whitehousedossier.com/2015/03/23/liberal-prof-dershowitz-cruz-charts-brilliant/, he and Rubio are easily the most gifted speakers and would bury Obama in a debate (teleprompters are not in their repertoire). Rubio’s like-ability factor is tough to beat, besides …he’s got a great story to tell not too mention a pretty solid platform.

The Republicans will continue as the party of diversity and will put the impressive Carly Fiorina as VP. Couple that with the 1st Hispanic as President and you’ll see the Democrat party twisting in knots for years to come.

One last item, if Dr. Ben Carson gets the nod, what does that say to every single one on the left who cried “racism” when Republicans denounced Obama?
Even if he doesn’t, what does that say anyway?

Heh, heh…..the knots would be so tightly twisted…talk about pretzel logic.

Today in History – August 24

0079 – Mount Vesuvius erupted killing approximately 20,000 people. The cities of Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum were buried in volcanic ash.

0410 – The Visigoths overran Rome. This event symbolized the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

1456 – The printing of the Gutenberg Bible was completed.

1572 – The Catholics began their slaughter of the French Protestants in Paris. The killings claimed about 70,000 people.

1814 – Washington, DC, was invaded by British forces that set fire to the White House and Capitol.

1853 – The first convention of the American Pharmaceutical Association was held.

1869 – A patent for the waffle iron was received by Cornelius Swarthout.

1891 – Thomas Edison applied patents for the kinetoscope and kinetograph (U.S. Pats. 493,426 and 589,168).

1912 – A four-pound limit was set for parcels sent through the U.S. Post Office mail system.

1932 – Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the U.S. non-stop. The trip from Los Angeles, CA to Newark, NJ, took about 19 hours.

1949 – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) went into effect. The agreement was that an attack against on one of the parties would be considered “an attack against them all.”

1954 – The Communist Party was virtually outlawed in the U.S. when the Communist Control Act went into effect.

1959 – Three days after Hawaiian statehood, Hiram L. Fong was sworn in as the first Chinese-American U.S. senator while Daniel K. Inouye was sworn in as the first Japanese-American U.S. representative.

1963 – John Pennel pole-vaulted 17 feet and 3/4 inches becoming the first to break the 17-foot barrier.

1968 – France became the 5th thermonuclear power when they exploded a hydrogen bomb in the South Pacific.

1975 – Davey Lopes of the Los Angeles Dodgers set a major league baseball record when he stole his 38th consecutive base.

1985 – 27 anti-apartheid leaders were arrested in South Africa as racial violence rocked the country.

1986 – Frontier Airlines shut down. Thousands of people were left stranded.

1989 – Pete Rose, the manager of the Cincinnati Reds, was banned from baseball for life after being accused of gambling on baseball.

1989 – “Total war” was declared by Columbian drug lords on their government.

1989 – The U.S. space probe, Voyager 2, sent back photographs of Neptune.

1990 – Iraqi troops surrounded foreign missions in Kuwait.

1991 – Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as the head of the Communist Party.

1992 – China and South Korea established diplomatic relations.

1995 – Microsoft’s “Windows 95” went on sale.

1998 – U.S. officials cited a soil sample as part of the evidence that a Sudan plant was producing precursors to the VX nerve gas. And, therefore made it a target for U.S. missiles on August 20, 1998.

1998 – A donation of 24 beads was made, from three parties, to the Indian Museum of North America at the Crazy Horse Memorial. The beads are said to be those that were used in 1626 to buy Manhattan from the Indians.

2001 – In McAllen, TX, Bridgestone/Firestone agreed to settle out of court and pay a reported $7.5 million to a family in a rollover accident in their Ford Explorer.

2001 – The remains of nine American servicemen killed in the Korean War were returned to the U.S. The bodies were found about 60 miles north of Pyongyang. It was estimated that it would be a year before the identies of the soldiers would be known.

2001 – U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly was randomly picked to take over the Microsoft monopoly case. The judge was to decide how Microsoft should be punished for illegally trying to squelch its competitors.

2001 – NASA announced that operation of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite would end by September 30th due to budget restrictions. Though the satellite is best known for monitoring a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, it was designed to provide information about the upper atmosphere by measuring its winds, temperatures, chemistry and energy received from the sun.

2006 – The planet Pluto was reclassified as a “dwarf planet” by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Pluto’s status was changed due to the IAU’s new rules for an object qualifying as a planet. Pluto met two of the three rules because it orbits the sun and is large enough to assume a nearly round shape. However, since Pluto has an oblong orbit and overlaps the orbit of Neptune it disqualified Pluto as a planet.