Monthly Archives: June 2015

Today in History – June 30

1097 – The Crusaders defeated the Turks at Dorylaeum.

1841 – The Erie Railroad rolled out its first passenger train.

1859 – Charles Blondin became the first person to cross Niagara Falls on a tightrope.

1894 – Korea declared independence from China and asked for Japanese aid.

1908 – A meteor explosion in Siberia knocked down trees in a 40-mile radius and struck people unconscious some 40 miles away.

1912 – Belgian workers went on strike to demand universal suffrage.

1913 – Fighting broke out between Bulgaria and Greece and Spain. It was the beginning of the Second Balkan War.

1915 – During World War I, the Second Battle Artois ended when the French failed to take Vimy Ridge.

U.S. President Warren G. Harding appointed former President William Howard Taft chief justice of the United States.

1922 – Irish rebels in London assassinate Sir Henry Wilson, the British deputy for Northern Ireland.

1930 – France pulled its troops out of Germany’s Rhineland.

1934 – Adolf Hitler purged the Nazi Party by destroying the SA and bringing to power the SS in the “Night of the Long Knives.”

1935 – Fascists caused an uproar at the League of Nations when Haile Selassie of Ethiopia speaks.

1936 – Margaret Mitchell’s book, “Gone with the Wind,” was published.

1950 – U.S. President Harry Truman ordered U.S. troops into Korea and authorizes the draft.

1951 – On orders from Washington, General Matthew Ridgeway broadcasts that the United Nations was willing to discuss an armistice with North Korea.

1952 – CBS-TV debuted “The Guiding Light.”

1953 – The first Corvette rolled off the Chevrolet assembly line in Flint, MI. It sold for $3,250.

1955 – The U.S. began funding West Germany’s rearmament.

1957 – The American occupation headquarters in Japan was dissolved.

1958 – The U.S. Congress passed a law authorizing the admission of Alaska as the 49th state in the Union.

1960 – The Katanga province seceded from Congo (upon Congo’s independence from Belgium).

1962 – Los Angeles Dodger Sandy Koufax pitched his first no-hitter in a game with the New York Mets.

1964 – The last of U.N. troops left Congo after a four-year effort to bring stability to the country.

1970 – The Cincinnati Reds moved to their new home at Riverfront Stadium.

1971 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the government could not prevent the Washington Post or the New York Times from publishing the Pentagon Papers.

1971 – The Soviet spacecraft Soyuz 11 returned to Earth. The three cosmonauts were found dead inside.

1971 – The 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified when Ohio became the 38th state to approve it. The amendment lowered the minimum voting age to 18.

1974 – Russian ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov defected in Toronto, Canada.

1974 – The July 4th scene from the Steven Spielberg movie “Jaws” was filmed.

1977 – U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced his opposition to the B-1 bomber.

1984 – The longest professional football game took place in the United States Football League (USFL). The Los Angeles Express beat the Michigan Panthers 27-21 after 93 minutes and 33 seconds.

1985 – Yul Brynner left his role as the King of Siam after 4,600 performances in “The King and I.”

1986 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that states could outlaw homosexual acts between consenting adults.

1994 – The U.S. Figure Skating Association stripped Tonya Harding of the 1994 national championship and banned her from the organization for life for an attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan.

1998 – Officials confirmed that the remains of a Vietnam War serviceman buried in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery were identified as those of Air Force pilot Michael J. Blassie.

2000 – U.S. President Clinton signed the E-Signature bill to give the same legal validity to an electronic signature as a signature in pen and ink.

2004 – The international Cassini spacecraft entered Saturn’s orbit. The craft had been on a nearly seven-year journey.


Today in History – June 29

1236 – Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon took Cordoba in Spain.

1652 – Massachusetts declared itself an independent commonwealth.

1767 – The British Parliament approved the Townshend Revenue Acts. The acts imposed import duties on glass, lead, paint, paper and tea shipped to America.

1776 – The Virginia constitution was adopted and Patrick Henry was made governor.

1804 – Privates John Collins and Hugh Hall of the Lewis and Clark Expedition were found guilty by a court-martial consisting of members of the Corps of Discovery for getting drunk on duty. Collins received 100 lashes on his back and Hall received 50.

1860 – The first iron-pile lighthouse was completed at Minot’s Ledge, MA.

1880 – France annexed Tahiti.

1888 – Professor Frederick Treves performed the first appendectomy in England.

1897 – The Chicago Cubs scored 36 runs in a game against Louisville, setting a record for runs scored by a team in a single game.

1901 – The first edition of “Editor & Publisher” was issued.

1903 – The British government officially protested Belgian atrocities in the Congo.

1905 – Russian troops intervened as riots erupted in ports all over the country. Many ships were looted.

1917 – The Ukraine proclaimed independence from Russia.

1925 – Marvin Pipkin filed for a patent for the frosted electric light bulb.

1926 – Fascists in Rome added an hour to the work day in an economic efficiency measure.

1932 – Siam’s army seized Bangkok and announced an end to the absolute monarchy.

1932 – “Vic and Sade” debuted on NBC radio.

1941 – Joe DiMaggio got a base hit in his 42nd consecutive game. He broke George Sisler’s record from 1922.

1946 – British authorities arrested more than 2,700 Jews in Palestine in an attempt to end alleged terrorism.

1950 – U.S. President Harry S. Truman authorized a sea blockade of Korea.

1951 – The United States invited the Soviet Union to the Korean peace talks on a ship in Wonson Harbor.

1953 – The Federal Highway Act authorized the construction of 42,500 miles of freeway from coast to coast.

1954 – The Atomic Energy Commission voted against reinstating Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer’s access to classified information.

1955 – The Soviet Union sent tanks to Poznan, Poland, to put down anti-Communist demonstrations.

1956 – Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller were married. They were divorced on January 20, 1961.

1966 – The U.S. bombed fuel storage facilities near the North Vietnamese cities of Hanoi and Haiphong.

1967 – Israel removed barricades, re-unifying Jerusalem.

1972 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty could constitute “cruel and unusual punishment.” The ruling prompted states to revise their capital punishment laws.

1982 – Israel invaded Lebanon.

1987 – Vincent Van Gogh’s “Le Pont de Trinquetaille” was bought for $20.4 million at an auction in London, England.

1995 – The shuttle Atlantis and the Russian space station Mir docked, forming the largest man-made satellite ever to orbit the Earth.

1998 – With negotiations on a new labor agreement at a standstill, the National Basketball Association (NBA) announced that a lockout would be imposed at midnight.

2000 – In Santa Rosa, CA, the official groundbreaking ceremony took place for the Charles M. Schulz Museum.

2007 – The first generation Apple iPhone went on sale.

2011 – The state of Nevada passed the first law that permitted the operation of autonomous cars on public roads. The law went into effect on March 1, 2012 and did not permit the use of the cars to the general public. Google received the first self-driving vehicle license in the U.S. on May 4, 2012 in Nevada.


The United STATE – Is America ruled by supreme “despots”?

“A majority of citizens in 30 States voted to have marriage be between a man and a woman but five unelected Justices decided to invalidate their will on June 26, 2015.”

Have the 50 States been reduced to one United STATE run by 5 supreme despots?

Popular culture describes America as a democracy. Scholars clarify it is a constitutional republic. But actually, America is neither. It is being run as a despotism.

Thomas Jefferson warned in a letter to William Jarvis, Sept. 28, 1820:

“You seem…to consider the judges as the ultimate arbiters of all constitutional questions; a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one which would place us under the DESPOTISM of an oligarchy.”

Webster’s Dictionary defines “despotism” as: “Absolute and arbitrary authority…independent of the control of men.”

Jefferson added:

“Our judges are as honest as other men, and not more so… and their power (is) the more dangerous, as they are in office for life and not responsible, as the other functionaries are, to the elective control.

The Constitution has erected no such single tribunal, knowing that to whatever hands confided, with corruptions of time and party, its members would become DESPOTS.”

Jefferson wrote to Abigail Adams, Sept. 11, 1804:

“Nothing in the Constitution has given them (judges) a right to decide for the Executive, more than to the Executive to decide for them…

But the opinion which gives to the judges the right to decide what laws are constitutional, and what not, not only for themselves in their own sphere of action, but for the legislature and executive also, in their spheres, would make the judiciary a DESPOTIC branch.”

A majority of citizens in 30 States voted to have marriage be between a man and a woman but five unelected Justices decided to invalidate their will on June 26, 2015.

Governor Mike Huckabee stated:

“This irrational, unconstitutional rejection of the expressed will of the people in over 30 states will prove to be one of the court’s most disastrous decisions.”

Two Justices, Kagan and Ginsburg, were obliged to recuse themselves as they had participated in homosexual weddings, but they refused, casting a shadow of illegitimacy over their decision as they displayed bias and partiality.

Governor Bobby Jindal stated:

“The Supreme Court decision today…tramples on States’ rights that were once protected by the 10th Amendment of the Constitution.”

Governor Jeb Bush stated:

“Guided by my faith, I believe in traditional marriage.  I believe the Supreme Court should have allowed the States to make this decision.”

Governor Rick Perry stated:

“I’m a firm believer in traditional marriage, and I also believe the 10th Amendment leaves it to each State to decide this issue…

Our founding fathers did not intend for the judicial branch to legislate from the bench, and as president, I would appoint strict Constitutional conservatives who will apply the law as written.”

Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard and the first woman to lead one of the top twenty U.S. companies, stated:

“This is only the latest example of an activist court ignoring its constitutional duty to say what the law is and not what the law should be…

I do not agree that the Court can or should redefine marriage. I believe that responsibility should have remained with the States and voters where this conversation has continued in churches, town halls and living rooms around the country.”

Justice Samuel Alito stated:

“Today’s decision usurps the constitutional right of the people to decide whether to keep or alter the traditional understanding of marriage… All Americans, whatever their thinking on that issue, should worry about what the majority’s claim of power portends.”

Former Senator Rick Santorum stated:

“The Court is 1 of 3 coequal branches of government & they have an imperfect record. Stakes are too high to cede marriage to unelected judges.”

Governor Mike Huckabee stated:

“The Supreme Court isn’t the supreme branch… Five lawyers on the Supreme Court can no more repeal the laws of nature and nature’s God on marriage than they can the laws of gravity…

I will not acquiesce to an imperial court any more than our Founders acquiesced to an imperial British monarch. We must resist and reject judicial tyranny, not retreat…

Under our Constitution, the court cannot write a law, even though some cowardly politicians will wave the white flag and accept it without realizing that they are failing their sworn duty to reject abuses from the court.”

Governor Scott Walker called for:

“an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to reaffirm the ability of the States to continue to define marriage.”

Senator Marco Rubio stated:

“I believe that marriage, as the key to strong family life, is the most important institution in our society and should be between one man and one woman. People who disagree with the traditional definition of marriage have the right to change their state laws. That is the right of our people, not the right of the unelected judges or justices of the Supreme Court.”

Justice Antonin Scalia stated:

“I write separately to call attention to this Court’s threat to American democracy… Today’s decree says that my Ruler, and the Ruler of 320 million Americans coast-to-coast, is a majority of the nine lawyers on the Supreme Court…

This practice of constitutional revision by an unelected committee of nine, always accompanied (as it is today) by extravagant praise of liberty, robs the People of the most important liberty they asserted in the Declaration of Independence and won in the Revolution of 1776 – the freedom to govern themselves…”

Justice Scalia added:

“To allow the policy question of same-sex marriage to be considered and resolved by a select, patrician, highly unrepresentative panel of nine is to violate a principle even more fundamental than no taxation without representation: no social transformation without representation.”

Senator Ted Cruz stated:

“”This is not a typical moment in American history… The last 24 hours at the United States Supreme Court were among the darkest hours of our nation…”

Senator Cruz added:

“This week, we have twice seen Supreme Court justices violating their judicial oaths…

I have already introduced a constitutional amendment to preserve the authority of elected state legislatures to define marriage as the union of one man and one woman… And also legislation stripping the federal courts of jurisdiction over legal assaults on marriage.”

Franklin Graham stated:

“The court – since it never defined marriage – doesn’t have the right to redefine it. God gave us marriage. Period. And God doesn’t change his mind.”

 

OF THE PEOPLE

“…that government OF THE PEOPLE, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” -Abraham Lincoln, November 19, 1863

Attempting to usurp the role of solver of social ills, Democrat-appointed Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney gave his infamous Dred Scott decision in 1857, stating that slaves were not citizens but property.

President Abraham Lincoln disagreed with that decision, stating in his Inaugural Address, March 4, 1861:

“I do not forget the position assumed by some that constitutional questions are to be decided by the Supreme Court…

The candid citizen must confess that if the policy of the Government upon vital questions affecting the whole people is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court, the instant they are made…the people will have ceased to be their own rulers, having to that extent practically resigned their Government into the hands of the eminent tribunal.”

Dr. Ben Carson commented on how judicial review “has changed from the original intent”:

“Dred Scott is a perfect example… The Supreme Court came up with this and Abraham Lincoln did not agree with it… It caused a lot of conflict and eventually led to a Civil War.”

WAR ON JUDEO-CHRISTIAN BELIEFS

If recent experience is any indicator, those who do not embrace this new definition of marriage will immediately be:

-sued,
-fired,
-bullied,
-boycotted,
-threatened,
-called names,
-driven from the military,
-accused of being hateful,
-have pastors’ sermons censored,
-singled-out for auditing by the IRS,
-have churches lose tax exemption, and
-be targeted by the Attorney General for prosecution.

Dr. Carson said:

“I call on Congress to make sure deeply held religious views are respected and protected.  The government must never force Christians to violate their religious beliefs.

Franklin Graham warned:

“I believe God could bring judgment upon America… There will be persecution of Christians for our stand…

Churches and faith-based business should prepare for lawsuits and government investigations. Pastors who refuse to perform gay marriages and preach from the Bible should prepare for hate crime charges.

All dissent will be silenced by the government and the activists… An overwhelming number of Christians will defy the law.”

Governor Mike Huckabee stated:

“This irrational, unconstitutional decision threatens religious liberty – the heart of 1st Amendment. Congress must act… The Supreme Court is not the Supreme Being…”

Governor Huckabee added:

“The only outcome worse than this flawed, failed decision would be for the President and Congress, two co-equal branches of government, to surrender in the face of this out-of-control act of unconstitutional, judicial tyranny.”

Carly Fiorina wrote:

“All our effort should be focused on protecting the religious liberties and freedom of conscience of those Americans that profoundly disagree with today’s decision.”

Senator Marco Rubio: stated:

“The next president and all in public office must strive to protect the First Amendment rights of religious institutions and millions of Americans whose faiths hold a traditional view of marriage. This is a constitutional duty, not a political opinion.

Our nation was founded on the human right of religious freedom, and our elected leaders have a duty to protect that right by ensuring that no one is compelled by law to violate their conscience.

Governor Jindal noted:

“Marriage between a man and a woman was established by God, and no earthly court can alter that… This ruling must not be used as pretext by Washington to erode our right to religious liberty.”

Governor Jeb Bush stated:

“In a country as diverse as ours, good people who have opposing views should be able to live side by side. It is now crucial that as a country we protect religious freedom and the right of conscience and also not discriminate.”

 

As standards of sexual behavior are cut loose from the encumbrances of traditional values, the logical next step would be to legalize:

-polygamy,
-incest,
-group marriages,
-child brides,
-pedophilia,
-bestiality and
-any other conceivable arrangement.

Indeed, arguments to prevent this progression from occurring are purely arbitrary in their reasoning.

Reiterating values accepted since the beginning of recorded history, Franklin Graham stated:

“I’m disappointed because the government is recognizing sin… This court is endorsing sin… God gave marriage between a man and a woman and that’s what marriage is…

If pastors are going to be forced to provide marriage services for gay couples, I’m not going to do it…”

Franklin Graham concluded:

“I am reminded of something the late Charles Colson wrote: ‘If we’re not willing to fight this, even to the point of breaking the law, or refusing to recognize the law, then we will lose everything.’ Given the choice of obeying God or the government, I believe Christians will obey God – even if there is hell to pay.”

In his 1841 Inaugural Address, President William Henry Harrison warned:

“The great danger to our institutions does…appear to me to be…the accumulation in one of the departments of that which was assigned to others. Limited as are the powers which have been granted, still enough have been granted to constitute a despotism if concentrated in one of the departments.”

ARE ELECTIONS AN EXERCISE IN FUTILITY?

Immense effort goes into the legislative process:

-registering voters,
-campaigning for candidates,
-manning polling places,
-voter turn-out,
-swearing into office,
-introducing bills,
-debating bills,
-voting on bills,
-overriding vetoes

yet this is all an exercise in futility if a few unelected judges can invalidate the entire process.

For example:

-The Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare, was forced through a Democrat-controlled Congress without public awareness, as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi admitted in her now-infamous statement “We have to pass the bill to find out what’s in it.”

Thirty-four States chose not to set-up exchanges to administer Obamacare, but the Supreme Court decided in King v. Burwell, June 25, 2015, that the Federal Government could overrule the will of the States. Justice Scalia wrote in his dissent: “It is bad enough for a court to cross out ‘by the State’ once. But seven times?”

Other cases where government OF THE PEOPLE perished are:

Arizona voted English as their official language, but Federal Judges overruled. (9th Circuit, Prop. 106, March 3, 1997)

Arkansas passed term limits for politicians, but Federal Judges overruled. (Sup. Ct., Term Limits v Thornton, May 22, 1995)

Californians voted to stop state-funded taxpayer services to illegal aliens, but Federal Judges overruled. (Prop. 187, Nov. 20, 1995)

Colorado citizens voted not to give special rights to homosexuals, but Federal Judges overruled. (Sup. Ct. Romer v Evans, 1992)

Missouri voters defeated a tax increase, but Federal Judges overruled. (8th Circuit, Missouri v Jenkins, Apr. 18, 1990)

Missouri citizens limited contributions to State candidates, but a Federal Judge overruled. (8th Circuit, Shrink Pac v Nixon, Jan. 24, 2000)

Missouri passed “A Woman’s Right to Know.” Governor Bob Holden veto it. Legislators overrode his veto, but a Federal Judge overruled. (U.S. District Judge Scott O. Wright, Sep. 11, 2000)

Nebraska citizens passed a Marriage Amendment with 70% of the vote, but a Federal Judge overruled. (U.S. District Judge Joseph Batallion, May 12, 2005)

New York citizens voted against physician-assisted suicide, but Federal Judges overruled. (2nd Circuit, Apr. 2, 1996)

Washington citizens voted against physician-assisted suicide, but Federal Judges overruled. (9th Circuit, Mar. 6, 1996)

Washington passed term limits for politicians, but Federal Judges overruled. (Sup. Ct., Term Limits v Thornton, May 22, 1995)

Missouri’s legislators passed a ban on partial birth abortion Sept. 5, 1999. Democrat Governor Mel Carnahan vetoed it. In a historic session, fifteen thousand citizens knelt in prayer around the State Capitol as the Legislature overrode his veto. Days later Federal District Judge Scott O. Wright suspended the law – and five years later it is still in limbo.

For years a bill to ban partial birth abortion worked its way through the U.S. Congress, being signed by the President Nov. 5, 2003. The next day a Federal Judge suspended the law. In fact, thirty-one States passed bans on partial birth abortion, only to have unelected Federal Judges suspend them.

Thomas Jefferson warned Mr. Hammond in 1821:

“The germ of dissolution of our federal government is in…the federal judiciary; an irresponsible body…working like gravity by night and by day, gaining a little today and a little tomorrow, and advancing its noiseless step like a thief, over the field of jurisdiction, until all shall be USURPED FROM THE STATES.”

Fifty-five men wrote the Constitution, but only thirty-nine signed it. Why did the some not sign it? Because they did not think it put enough limits on the power of the Federal Government.

Men like Samuel Adams and Patrick Henry were against the Constitution. Why? Because they did not think it put enough limits on the power of the Federal Government.

The promoters of the Constitution convinced the Thirteen States that if they ratified the Constitution, the first action of Congress would be to put limits on the new Federal Government. There were ten limits – the First Ten Amendments or Bill of Rights. Over time, the Federal Government usurped power from the States.

Senator Ted Cruz proposed a “retention election” for Supreme Court Justices every eight years:

“Every justice, beginning with the second national election after his or her appointment, will answer to the American people and the states in a retention election every eight years…

Those justices deemed unfit for retention by both a majority of the American people as a whole and by majorities of the electorates in at least half of the 50 states will be removed from office and disqualified from future service on the Court…

This week’s opinions are but the latest in a long line of judicial assaults on our Constitution and the common-sense values that have made America great… Enough is enough… This must stop. Liberty is in the balance.”

James Madison sums up the dilemma in Federalist Paper #51:

“In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.”

President Andrew Jackson stated in his Seventh Annual Message, Dec. 7, 1835:

“All history tells us that a free people should be watchful of delegated power, and should never acquiesce in a practice which will diminish their control over it.”

CONFUSION

November 18, 2003, even as Massachusetts Legislators were working to define marriage as between a man and a woman, four State Supreme Court Judges “ordered” the State Legislature to pass a law within 180 days recognizing homosexual marriage.

Deciding what laws are needed is the responsibility of the Legislative Branch. The Judicial Branch is simply to administer the laws according to the meaning the legislators had when passing the laws.

Thomas Jefferson explained to Supreme Court Justice William Johnson, June 12, 1823:

“On every question of construction, carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates, and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed.”

Baron Montesquieu, the most quoted writer by the Framers of the Constitution, warned of the dangers of uncontrolled judicial power in his Spirit of the Laws, 1748:

“Nor is there liberty if the power of judging is not separated from legislative power and from executive power.

If it were joined to legislative power, the power over life and liberty of the citizens would be arbitrary, for the judge would be the legislator.

If it were joined to executive power, the judge could have the force of an oppressor. All would be lost if the same…body of principal men…exercised these three powers.”

Alexis de Tocqueville, author of Democracy in America, 1835, warned:

“The President, who exercises a limited power, may err without causing great mischief in the State. Congress may decide amiss without destroying the Union, because the electoral body in which Congress originates may cause it to retract its decision by changing its members.

But if the Supreme Court is ever composed of imprudent men or bad citizens, the Union may be plunged into anarchy or civil war.”

States must be vigilant or they will become irrelevant. The nation’s Flag may soon be 13 stripes and instead of 50 stars, one big star, as America’s constitutional republic is transformed into the United STATE.


Today in History – June 28

1635 – The French colony of Guadeloupe was established in the Caribbean.

1675 – Frederick William of Brandenburg crushed the Swedes.

1709 – The Russians defeated the Swedes and Cossacks at the Battle of Poltava.

1776 – American Colonists repulsed a British sea attack on Charleston, SC.

1778 – Mary “Molly Pitcher” Hays McCauley, wife of an American artilleryman, carried water to the soldiers during the Battle of Monmouth and, supposedly, took her husband’s place at his gun after he was overcome with heat.

1869 – R. W. Wood was appointed as the first Surgeon General of the U.S. Navy.

1894 – The U.S. Congress made Labor Day a U.S. national holiday.

1902 – The U.S. Congress passed the Spooner bill, it authorized a canal to be built across the isthmus of Panama.

1911 – Samuel J. Battle became the first African-American policeman in New York City.

1914 – Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was assassinated in Sarajevo along with his wife, Duchess Sophie.

1919 – The Treaty of Versailles was signed ending World War I exactly five years after it began. The treaty also established the League of Nations.

1921 – A coal strike in Great Britain was settled after three months.

1930 – More than 1,000 communists were routed during an assault on the British consulate in London.

1939 – Pan American Airways began the first transatlantic passenger service.

1938 – The U.S. Congress created the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) to insure construction loans.

1940 – The “Quiz Kids” was heard on NBC radio for the first time.

1942 – German troops launched an offensive to seize Soviet oil fields in the Caucasus and the city of Stalingrad.

1943 – “The Dreft Star Playhouse” debuted on NBC radio.

1944 – “The Alan Young Show” debuted on NBC radio.

1945 – U.S. General Douglas MacArthur announced the end of Japanese resistance in the Philippines.

1949 – The last U.S. combat troops were called home from Korea, leaving only 500 advisers.

1950 – North Korean forces captured Seoul, South Korea.

1951 – “Amos ’n’ Andy” moved to CBS-TV from radio.

1954 – French troops began to pull out of Vietnam’s Tonkin Province.

1960 – In Cuba, Fidel Castro confiscated American-owned oil refineries without compensation.

1964 – Malcolm X founded the Organization for Afro American Unity to seek independence for blacks in the Western Hemisphere.

1965 – The first commercial satellite began communications service. It was Early Bird (Intelsat I).

1967 – Israel formally declared Jerusalem reunified under its sovereignty following its capture of the Arab sector in the June 1967 war.

1971 – The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the draft evasion conviction of Muhammad Ali.

1972 – U.S. President Nixon announced that no new draftees would be sent to Vietnam.

1976 – The first women entered the U.S. Air Force Academy.

1978 – The U.S. Supreme Court ordered the medical school at the University of California at Davis to admit Allan Bakke. Bakke, a white man, argued he had been a victim of reverse racial discrimination.

1996 – The Citadel voted to admit women, ending a 153-year-old men-only policy at the South Carolina military school.

1996 – Charles M. Schulz got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

1997 – Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting Evander Holyfield’s ear after three rounds of their WBA heavyweight title fight in Las Vegas, NV.

1998 – Poland, due to shortage of funds, is allowed to lease, U.S. aircraft to bring military force up to NATO standards.

1998 – The Cincinnati Enquirer apologized to Chiquita banana company and retracted their stories that questioned company’s business practices. They also agreed to pay more than $10 million to settle legal claims.

2000 – The U.S. Supreme Court declared that a Nebraska law that outlawed “partial birth abortions” was unconstitutional. About 30 U.S. states had similar laws at the time of the ruling.

2000 – Darva Conger announced that she had done a layout for Playboy magazine. Conger had married Rick Rockwell on Fox-TV’s “Who Wants to Marry a Multimillionaire.”

2000 – The European Commission announced that they had blocked the planned merger between the U.S. companies WorldCom Inc. and Sprint due to competition concerns.

2000 – Six-year-old Elián González returned to Cuba from the U.S. with his father. The child had been the center of an international custody dispute.

2001 – Slobodan Milosevic was taken into custody and was handed over to the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands. The indictment charged Milosevic and four other senior officials, with crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war in Kosovo.

2001 – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit set aside an order that would break up Microsoft for antitrust violations. However, the judges did agree that the company was in violation of antitrust laws.

2004 – The U.S. turned over official sovereignty to Iraq’s interim leadership. The event took place two days earlier than previously announced to thwart insurgents’ attempts at undermining the transfer.

2004 – The U.S. resumed diplomatic ties with Libya after a 24-year break.

2004 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that enemy combatants could challenge their detention in U.S. Courts.

2007 – The American bald eagle was removed from the endangered species list.

2010 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that Americans have the right to own a gun for self-defense anywhere they live.


Today in History – June 27

2002 – Daniella, #2 of our 3 kids………….was born 13 years ago. Happy Birthday Daniella, I love you!

0363 – The death of Roman Emperor Julian brought an end to the Pagan Revival.

1693 – “The Ladies’ Mercury” was published by John Dunton in London. It was the first women’s magazine and contained a “question and answer” column that became known as a “problem page.”

1743 – King George II of England defeated the French at Dettingen, Bavaria, in the War of the Austrian Succession.

1787 – Edward Gibbon completed “The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” It was published the following May.

1801 – British forces defeated the French and took control of Cairo, Egypt.

1847 – New York and Boston were linked by telegraph wires.

1871 – The yen became the new form of currency in Japan.

1885 – Chichester Bell and Charles S. Tainter applied for a patent for the gramophone. It was granted on May 4, 1886.

1893 – The New York stock market crashed. By the end of the year 600 banks and 74 railroads had gone out of business.

1905 – The battleship Potemkin succumbed to a mutiny on the Black Sea.

1918 – Two German pilots were saved by parachutes for the first time.

1923 – Yugoslav Premier Nikola Pachitch was wounded by Serb attackers in Belgrade.

1924 – Democrats offered Mrs. Leroy Springs for vice presidential nomination. She was the first woman considered for the job.

1927 – The U.S. Marines adopted the English bulldog as their mascot.

1929 – Scientists at Bell Laboratories in New York revealed a system for transmitting television pictures.

1931 – Igor Sikorsky filed U.S. Patent 1,994,488, which marked the breakthrough in helicopter technology.

1940 – Robert Pershing Wadlow was measured by Dr. Cyril MacBryde and Dr. C. M. Charles. They recorded his height at 8′ 11.1.” He was only 22 at the time of his death on July 15, 1940.

1942 – The FBI announced the capture of eight Nazi saboteurs who had been put ashore from a submarine on New York’s Long Island.

1944 – During World War II, American forces completed their capture of the French port of Cherbourg from the German army.

1949 – “Captain Video and His Video Rangers” premiered on the Dumont Television Network.

1950 – Two days after North Korea invaded South Korea, U.S. President Truman ordered the Air Force and Navy into the Korean conflict. The United Nations Security Council had asked for member nations to help South Korea repel an invasion from the North.

1954 – The world’s first atomic power station opened at Obninsk, near Moscow.

1955 – The first “Wide Wide World” was broadcast on NBC-TV.

1955 – The state of Illinois enacted the first automobile seat belt legislation.

1958 – NBC’s “Matinee Theatre” was seen for the final time.

1959 – The play, “West Side Story,” with music by Leonard Bernstein, closed after 734 performances on Broadway.

1961 – Arthur Michael Ramsey was enthroned as the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury.

1964 – Ernest Borgnine and Ethel Merman were married. It only lasted 38 days.

1966 – “Dark Shadows” began running on ABC-TV.

1967 – The world’s first cash dispenser was installed at Barclays Bank in Enfield, England. The device was invented by John Sheppard-Barron. The machine operated on a voucher system and the maximum withdrawal was $28.

1967 – Two hundred people were arrested during a race riot in Buffalo, NY.

1969 – Patrons at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village, clashed with police. This incident is considered to be the birth of the homosexual rights movement.

1972 – Bobby Hull signed a 10-year hockey contract for $2,500,000. He became a player and coach of the Winnipeg Jets of the World Hockey Association.

1973 – Former White House counsel John W. Dean told the Senate Watergate Committee about an “enemies list” that was kept by the Nixon White House.

1973 – Nixon vetoed a Senate ban on bombing Cambodia.

1980 – U.S. President Carter signed legislation reviving draft registration.

1984 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that individual colleges could make their own TV package deals.

1984 – The Federal Communications Commission moved to deregulate U.S. commercial TV by lifting most programming requirements and ending day-part restrictions on advertising.

1985 – Route 66 was officially removed from the United States Highway System.

1985 – The U.S. House of Representatives voted to limit the use of combat troops in Nicaragua.

1986 – The World Court ruled that the U.S. had broken international law by aiding Nicaraguan rebels.

1991 – Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall resigned from the U.S. Supreme Court. He had been appointed in 1967 by President Lyndon Johnson.

1995 – Qatar’s Crown Prince Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani ousted his father in a bloodless palace coup.

1998 – An English woman was impregnated with her dead husband’s sperm after two-year legal battle over her right to the sperm.

1998 – In a live joint news conference in China U.S. President Clinton and President Jiang Zemin offered an uncensored airing of differences on human rights, freedom, trade and Tibet.

2002 – In the U.S., the Securities and Exchange Commission required companies with annual sales of more than $1.2 billion to submit sworn statements backing up the accuracy of their financial reports.

2005 – In Alaska’s Denali National Park, a roughly 70-million year old dinosaur track was discovered. The track was form a three-toed Cretaceous period dinosaur.


Today in History – June 26

1096 – Peter the Hermit’s crusaders forced their way across Sava, Hungary.

1243 – The Seljuk Turkish army in Asia Minor was wiped out by the Mongols.

1483 – Richard III usurped himself to the English throne.

1794 – The French defeated an Austrian army at the Battle of Fleurus.

1804 – The Lewis and Clark Expedition reached the mouth of the Kansas River after completing a westward trek of nearly 400 river miles.

1819 – The bicycle was patented by W.K. Clarkson, Jr.

1844 – John Tyler took Julia Gardiner as his bride, thus becoming the first U.S. President to marry while in office.

1870 – The first section of the boardwalk in Atlantic City, NJ, was opened to the public.

1894 – The American Railway Union called a general strike in sympathy with Pullman workers.

1900 – The United States announced that it would send troops to fight against the Boxer rebellion in China.

1900 – A commission that included Dr. Walter Reed began the fight against the deadly disease yellow fever.

1907 – Russia’s nobility demanded drastic measures to be taken against revolutionaries.

1908 – Shah Muhammad Ali’s forces squelched the reform elements of Parliament in Persia.

1917 – General John “Black Jack” Pershing arrived in France with the American Expeditionary Force.

1925 – Charlie Chaplin’s comedy “The Gold Rush” premiered in Hollywood.

1926 – A memorial to the first U.S. troops in France was unveiled at St. Nazaire.

1924 – After eight years of occupation, American troops left the Dominican Republic.

1927 – The Coney Island Cyclone roller coaster opened in New York.

1936 – The Focke-Wulf Fw 61 made its first flight. It is often considered the first practical helicopter.

1942 – The Grumman F6F Hellcat fighter was flown for the first time.

1945 – The U.N. Charter was signed by 50 nations in San Francisco, CA.

1948 – The Berlin Airlift began as the U.S., Britain and France started ferrying supplies to the isolated western sector of Berlin.

1951 – The Soviet Union proposed a cease-fire in the Korean War.

1959 – CBS journalist Edward R. Murrow interviewed Lee Remick. It was his 500th and final guest on “Person to Person.”

1959 – U.S. President Eisenhower joined Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II in ceremonies officially opening the St. Lawrence Seaway.

1961 – A Kuwaiti vote opposed Iraq’s annexation plans.

1963 – U.S. President John Kennedy announced “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner) at the Berlin Wall.

1971 – The U.S. Justice Department issued a warrant for Daniel Ellsberg, accusing him of giving away the Pentagon Papers.

1975 – Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi declared a state of emergency due to “deep and widespread conspiracy.”

1976 – The CN (Canadian National) Tower in Toronto, Canada, opened.

1979 – Muhammad Ali, at 37 years old, announced that he was retiring as world heavyweight boxing champion.

1981 – In Mountain Home, Idaho, Virginia Campbell took her coupons and rebates and bought $26,460 worth of groceries. She only paid 67 cents after all the discounts.

1985 – Wilbur Snapp was ejected after playing “Three Blind Mice” during a baseball game. The incident followed a call made by umpire Keith O’Connor.

1987 – The movie “Dragnet” opened in the U.S.

1996 – The U.S. Supreme Court ordered the Virginia Military Institute to admit women or forgo state support.

1997 – The U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Communications Decency Act of 1996 that made it illegal to distribute indecent material on the Internet.

1997 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld state laws that allow for a ban on doctor-assisted suicides.

1998 – The U.S. and Peru open school to train commandos to patrol Peru’s rivers for drug traffickers.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that employers are always potentially liable for supervisor’s sexual misconduct toward an employee.

2000 – The Human Genome Project and Celera Genomics Corp. jointly announced that they had created a working draft of the human genome.

2000 – Indonesia’s President Abdurrahman Wahid declared a state of emergency in the Moluccas due to the escalation of fighting between Christians and Muslims.

2001 – Ray Bourque (Colorado Avalanche) announced his retirement just 17 days after winning his first Stanley Cup. Bouque retired after 22 years and held the NHL record for highest-scoring defenseman and playing in 19 consecutive All-Star games.

2002 – David Hasseloff checked into The Betty Ford Center for treatment of alcoholism.

2002 – WorldCom Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.


Today in History – June 25

0841 – Charles the Bald and Louis the German defeated Lothar at Fontenay.

1080 – At Brixen, a council of bishops declared Pope Gregory to be deposed and Archbishop Guibert as antipope Clement III.

1580 – The Book of Concord was first published. The book is a collection of doctrinal standards of the Lutheran Church.

1658 – Aurangzeb proclaimed himself emperor of the Moghuls in India.

1767 – Mexican Indians rioted as Jesuit priests were ordered home.

1788 – Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution and became the 10th state of the United States.

1864 – Union troops surrounding Petersburg, VA, began building a mine tunnel underneath the Confederate lines.

1867 – Lucien B. Smith patented the first barbed wire.

1868 – The U.S. Congress enacted legislation granting an eight-hour day to workers employed by the Federal government.

1868 – Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina were readmitted to the Union.

1870 – In Spain, Queen Isabella abdicated in favor of Alfonso XII.

1876 – Lt. Col. Custer and the 210 men of U.S. 7th Cavalry were killed by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at Little Big Horn in Montana. The event is known as “Custer’s Last Stand.”

1877 – In Philadelphia, PA, Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated the telephone for Sir William Thomson (Baron Kelvin) and Emperor Pedro II of Brazil at the Centennial Exhibition.

1906 – Pittsburgh millionaire Harry Kendall Thaw, the son of coal and railroad baron William Thaw, shot and killed Stanford White. White, a prominent architect, had a tryst with Florence Evelyn Nesbit before she married Thaw. The shooting took place at the premeire of Mamzelle Champagne in New York.

1910 – The U.S. Congress authorized the use of postal savings stamps.

1917 – The first American fighting troops landed in France.

1920 – The Greeks took 8,000 Turkish prisoners in Smyrna.

1921 – Samuel Gompers was elected head of the AFL for the 40th time.

1938 – Gaelic scholar Douglas Hyde was inaugurated as the first president of the Irish Republic.

1941 – Finland declared war on the Soviet Union.

1946 – Ho Chi Minh traveled to France for talks on Vietnamese independence.

1948 – The Soviet Union tightened its blockade of Berlin by intercepting river barges heading for the city.

1950 – North Korea invaded South Korea initiating the Korean War.

1951 – In New York, the first regular commercial color TV transmissions were presented on CBS using the FCC-approved CBS Color System. The public did not own color TV’s at the time.

1959 – The Cuban government seized 2.35 million acres under a new agrarian reform law.

1959 – Eamon De Valera became president of Ireland at the age of 76.

1962 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the use of unofficial non-denominational prayer in public schools was unconstitutional.

1964 – U.S. President Lyndon Johnson ordered 200 naval personnel to Mississippi to assist in finding three missing civil rights workers.

1968 – Bobby Bonds (San Francisco Giants) hit a grand-slam home run in his first game with the Giants. He was the first player to debut with a grand-slam.

1970 – The U.S. Federal Communications Commission handed down a ruling (35 FR 7732), making it illegal for radio stations to put telephone calls on the air without the permission of the person being called.

1973 – Erskine Childers Jr. became president of Ireland after the retirement of Eamon De Valera.

1973 – White House Counsel John Dean admitted that U.S. President Nixon took part in the Watergate cover-up.

1975 – Mozambique became independent. Samora Machel was sworn in as president after 477 years of Portuguese rule.

1981 – The U.S. Supreme Court decided that male-only draft registration was constitutional.

1985 – ABC’s “Monday Night Football” began with a new line-up. The trio was Frank Gifford, Joe Namath and O.J. Simpson.

1985 – New York Yankees officials enacted the rule that mandated that the team’s bat boys were to wear protective helmets during all games.

1986 – The U.S. Congress approved $100 million in aid to the Contras fighting in Nicaragua.

1987 – Austrian President Kurt Waldheim visited Pope John Paul II at the Vatican. The meeting was controversial due to allegations that Waldheim had hidden his Nazi past.

1990 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of an individual, whose wishes are clearly made, to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment. “The right to die” decision was made in the Curzan vs. Missouri case.

1991 – The last Soviet troops left Czechoslovakia 23 years after the Warsaw Pact invasion.

1991 – The Yugoslav republics of Slovenia and Croatia declared their independence from Yugoslavia.

1993 – Kim Campbell took office as Canada’s first woman prime minister. She assumed power upon the resignation of Brian Mulroney.

1997 – The Russian space station Mir was hit by an unmanned cargo vessel. Much of the power supply was knocked out and the station’s Spektr module was severely damaged.

1997 – U.S. air pollution standards were significantly tightened by U.S. President Clinton.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court rejected the line-item veto thereby striking down presidential power to cancel specific items in tax and spending legislation.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that those infected with HIV are protected by the Americans With Disabilities Act.

1998 – Microsoft’s “Windows 98” was released to the public.

1999 – Germany’s parliament approved a national Holocaust memorial to be built in Berlin.

2000 – U.S. and British researchers announced that they had completed a rough draft of a map of the genetic makeup of human beings. The project was 10 years old at the time of the announcement.

2000 – A Florida judge approved a class-action lawsuit to be filed against American Online (AOL) on behalf of hourly subscribers who were forced to view “pop-up” advertisements.