Monthly Archives: November 2014

Today in History – November 30

1700 – 8,000 Swedish troops under King Charles XII defeated an army of at least 50,000 Russians at the Battle of Narva. King Charles XII died on this day.

1782 – The United States and Britain signed preliminary peace articles in Paris, ending the Revolutionary War.

1803 – Spain completed the process of ceding Louisiana to France.

1804 – U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase went on trial accused of political bias. He was later acquitted by the U.S. Senate.

1838 – Three days after the French occupation of Vera Cruz Mexico declared war on France.

1853 – During the Crimean War, the Russian fleet attacked and destroyed the Turkish fleet at the battle of Sinope.

1858 – John Landis Mason received a patent for the first pepper shaker with a screw-on cap.

1875 – A.J. Ehrichson patented the oat-crushing machine.

1897 – Thomas Edison’s own motion picture projector had its first commercial exhibition.

1936 – London’s famed Crystal Palace was destroyed in a fire. The structure had been constructed for the International Exhibition of 1851.

1939 – The Russo-Finnish War began when 20 divisions of Soviet troops invaded Finland.

1940 – Lucille Ball and Cuban musician Desi Arnaz were married.

1949 – Chinese Communists captured Chungking.

1954 – In Sylacauga, AL, Elizabeth Hodges was injured when a meteorite crashed through the roof of her house. The rock weighed 8½-pounds.

1956 – CBS replayed the program “Douglas Edward and the News” three hours after it was received on the West Coast. It was the world’s first broadcast via videotape.

1962 – U Thant of Burma was elected secretary-general of the United Nations, succeeding the late Dag Hammarskjold.

1966 – The former British colony of Barbados became independent.

1971 – ABC-TV aired “Brian’s Song.” The movie was about Chicago Bears’ Brian Picolo and his friendship with Gale Sayers.

1981 – The U.S. and the Soviet Union opened negotiations in Geneva that were aimed at reducing nuclear weapons in Europe.

1982 – The motion picture “Ghandi” had its world premiere in New Delhi.

1986 – “Time” magazine published an interview with U.S. President Reagan. In the article, Reagan described fired national security staffer Oliver North as a “national hero.”

1988 – Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co. took over RJR Nabisco Inc. with a bid of $24.53 billion.

1989 – PLO leader Yasser Arafat was refused a visa to enter the United States in order to address the U.N. General Assebly in New York City.

1993 – U.S. President Clinton signed into law the Brady Bill. The bill required a five-day waiting period for handgun purchases and background checks of prospective buyers.

1995 – President Clinton became the first U.S. chief executive to visit Northern Ireland.

1998 – The Deutsche Bank AG announced that it would acquire Bankers Trust Corp. for $10.1 billion creating the world’s largest financial institution.

2001 – For the first time in it’s history, McDonald’s teamed up with a retail partner on its Happy Meal promotions. Toys R Us provided plush figures from it’s Animal Alley.

2004 – In Stockholm, Sweden, the Carl Larsson painting “Boenskoerd” (“Bean Harvest”) was sold at auction for $730,000. The work had been in a private collection for more than a century. The Larsson work “Vid Kattegatt” (“By Kattegatt”) sold for $640,000 at the same auction.


Today in History – November 29

1530 – Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, former adviser to England’s King Henry VIII, died.

1864 – The Sand Creek Massacre occurred in Colorado when a militia led by Colonel John Chivington, killed at least 400 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians who had surrendered and had been given permission to camp.

1890 – Navy defeated Army by a score of 24-0 in the first Army-Navy football game. The game was played at West Point, NY.

1892 – A patent was issued to Almon Brown Strowger for the rotary dial.

1929 – The first airplane flight over the South Pole was made by U.S. Navy Lt. Comdr. Richard E. Byrd.

1939 – The USSR broke off diplomatic relations with Finland prior to a Soviet attack.

1945 – The monarchy was abolished in Yugoslavia and a republic proclaimed.

1947 – The U.N. General Assembly passed a resolution that called for the division of Palestine between Arabs and Jews.

1961 – The Mercury-Atlas 5 spacecraft was launched by the U.S. with Enos the chimp on board. The craft orbited the earth twice before landing off Puerto Rico.

1963 – A Trans-Canada Airlines DC-8F with 111 passengers and 7 crew members crashed in woods north of Montreal 4 minutes after takeoff from Dorval Airport. All aboard were killed. The crash was the worst in Canada’s history.

1963 – U.S. President Johnson named a commission headed by Earl Warren to investigate the assassination of President Kennedy.

1967 – U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara announced that he was leaving the Johnson administration to become president of the World Bank.

1971 – The Professional Golf Championship was held at Walt Disney World for the first time.
Disney movies, music and books

1974 – In Britain, a bill that outlawed the Irish Republican Army became effective.

1975 – Bill Gates adopted the name Microsoft for the company he and Paul Allen had formed to write the BASIC computer language for the Altair.

1981 – Actress Natalie Wood drowned in a boating accident off Santa Catalina Island, CA, at the age 43.

1982 – The U.N. General Assembly voted that the Soviet Union should withdraw its troops from Afghanistan.

1986- Actor Cary Grant died at the age of 82.

1987 – A Korean jetliner disappeared off Burma, with 115 people aboard.

1987 – Cuban detainees released 26 hostages they’d been holding for more than a week at the Federal Detention Center in Oakdale, LA.

1988 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the rights of criminal defendants are not violated when police unintentionally fail to preserve potentially vital evidence.

1989 – In Czechoslovakia, the Communist-run parliament ended the party’s 40-year monopoly on power.

1990 – The U.N. Security Council voted to authorize military action if Iraq did not withdraw its troops from Kuwait and release all foreign hostages by January 15, 1991.

1991 – 17 people were killed in a 164-vehicle wreck during a dust storm near Coalinga, CA, on Interstate 5.

1992 – Dennis Byrd (New York Jets) was paralyzed after a neck injury in a game against the Kansas City Chiefs.

1994 – The U.S. House passed the revised General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

1994 – Fighter jets attacked the capital of Chechnya and its airport only hours after Russian President Boris Yeltsin demanded the breakaway republic end its civil war.

1996 – A U.N. court sentenced Bosnian Serb army soldier Drazen Erdemovic to 10 years in prison for his role in the massacre of 1,200 Muslims. The sentence was the first international war crimes sentence since World War II.

1998 – Swiss voters overwhelmingly rejected legalizing heroin and other narcotics.

2004 – The French government announced plans to build the Louvre II in northern France. The 236,808 square foot museum was the planned home for 500-600 works from the Louvre’s reserves.

2004 – Godzilla received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.


Today in History – November 28

1520 – Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan reached the Pacific Ocean after passing through the South American strait. The strait was named after him. He was the first European to sail the Pacific from the east.

1582 – William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway were married.

1757 – English poet, painter and engraver William Blake was born. Two of his best known works are “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience.”

1919 – American-born Lady Astor was elected the first female member of the British Parliament.

1922 – Capt. Cyril Turner of the Royal Air Force gave the first public exhibition of skywriting. He spelled out, “Hello USA. Call Vanderbilt 7200” over New York’s Times Square.

1925 – The Grand Ole Opry made its radio debut on station WSM.

1942 – 491 people died in a fire that destroyed the Coconut Grove in Boston.

1943 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet Leader Joseph Stalin met in Tehran to map out strategy concerning World War II.

1953 – New York City began 11 days without newspapers due to a strike of photoengravers.

1958 – The African nation of Chad became an autonomous republic within the French community.

1963 – U.S. President Johnson announced that Cape Canaveral would be renamed Cape Kennedy in honor of his assassinated predecessor. The name was changed back to Cape Canaveral in 1973 by a vote of residents.

1964 – The U.S. launched the space probe Mariner IV from Cape Kennedy on a course set for Mars.

1977 – Larry Bird was introduced as “College Basketball’s Secret Weapon” with a cover story in Sports Illustrated. (NBA)

1978 – The Iranian government banned religious marches.

1979 – An Air New Zealand DC-10 flying to the South Pole crashed in Antarctica killing all 257 people aboard.

1983 – The space shuttle Columbia took off with the STS-9 Spacelab in its cargo bay.

1985 – The Irish Senate approved the Anglo-Irish accord concerning Northern Ireland.

1987 – A South African Airways Boeing 747 crashed into the Indian Ocean. All 159 people aboard were killed.

1989 – Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci arrived in New York after escaping her homeland through Hungary.

1990 – Margaret Thatcher resigned as prime minister of Britain.

1992 – In Bosnia-Herzegovina, 137 tons of food and supplies were to be delivered to the isolated town of Srebrenica.

1992 – In King William’s Town, South Africa, black militant gunmen attacked a country club killing four people and injuring 20.

1993 – The play “Mixed Emotions” closed after 48 performances.

1994 – Jeffrey Dahmer, a convicted serial killer, was clubbed to death in a Wisconsin prison by a fellow inmate.

1994 – Norwegian voters rejected European Union membership.

1995 – U.S. President Clinton signed a $6 billion road bill that ended the federal 55 mph speed limit.

2010 – WikiLeaks released to the public more than 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables. About 100,000 were marked “secret” or “confidential.”


Happy Thanksgiving from Arizona

Another Fall day here….84 degrees.

A pic from Camelback Mountain …….

c-back mtn


Today in History – November 27

1684 – Japan’s shogun Yoshimune Tokugawa was born.

1701 – Anders Celsius was born in Sweden. He was the inventor of the Celsius thermometer.

1779 – The College of Pennsylvania became the University of Pennsylvania. It was the first legally recognized university in America.

1839 – The American Statistical Association was founded in Boston.

1889 – Curtis P. Brady was issued the first permit to drive an automobile through Central Park in New York City.

1901 – The Army War College was established in Washington, DC.

1910 – New York’s Pennsylvania Station opened.

1939 – The play “Key Largo,” by Maxwell Anderson, opened in New York.

1951 – Hosea Richardson became the first black horse racing jockey to be licensed in Florida.

1963 – U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered his first address to a joint session of Congress.

1970 – Pope Paul VI, visiting the Philippines, was attacked at the Manila airport by a Bolivian painter disguised as a priest.

1973 – The U.S. Senate voted to confirm Gerald R. Ford as vice president after the resignation of Spiro T. Agnew.

1978 – San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights activist, were shot to death inside City Hall by Dan White, a former supervisor.

1980 – Dave Williams (Chicago Bears) became the first player in NFL history to return a kick for touchdown in overtime.

1983 – 183 people were killed when a Colombian Avianca Airlines Boeing 747 crashed near Barajas airport in Madrid.

1985 – The British House of Commons approved the Anglo-Irish accord giving Dublin a consulting role in the governing of British-ruled Northern Ireland.

1987 – French hostages Jean-Louis Normandin and Roger Auque were set free by their pro-Iranian captors in West Beirut, Lebanon.

1989 – 107 people were killed when a bomb destroyed a Colombian jetliner minutes after the plane had taken off from Bogota’s international airport. Police blamed the incident on drug traffickers.

1991 – The UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution that led the way for the establishment of a UN peacekeeping operation in Yugoslavia.

1992 – In Venezuela, rebel forces tried but failed to overthrow President Carlos Andres Perez for the second time in ten months.


Obama Grubers Himself: “I Took an Action to Change the Law”

“But what you are not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law.”

The White House has argued that President Obama’s executive amnesty order last week was made well within the existing law. But in remarks in Chicago tonight, President Obama went off script and admitted that in fact he unilaterally made changes to the law.

Obama made the admission after getting heckled for several minutes by immigration protesters…

“Now, you’re absolutely right that there have been significant numbers of deportations. That’s true. But what you are not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law.”

Obama doesn’t have the power to do that. Or rather he doesn’t legally have that power. His illegal alien amnesty is illegal.

The media will argue that he misspoke, because apparently the Alinsky Chair professor in Constitutional Law is just too smart to know the difference, but it will aid in lawsuits being filed against the amnesty.

Obama has Grubered himself which is certainly handy. He has admitted that he acted illegally. Maybe now he can claim to have never heard of himself or that he only found out about what he said from the media.

h/t 


Today in History – November 26

1716 – The first lion to be exhibited in America went on display in Boston, MA.

1731 – English poet William Cowper was born. He is best known for “The Poplar Trees” and “The Task.”

1789 – U.S. President Washington set aside this day to observe the adoption of the Constitution of the United States.

1825 – The first college social fraternity, Kappa Alpha, was formed at Union College in Schenectady, NY.

1832 – Public streetcar service began in New York City.

1867 – J.B. Sutherland patented the refrigerated railroad car.

1917 – The National Hockey League (NHL) was officially formed in Montreal, Canada.

1922 – In Egypt, Howard Carter peered into the tomb of King Tutankhamen.

1940 – The Nazis forced 500,000 Jews of Warsaw, Poland to live within a walled ghetto.

1941 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill establishing the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. In 1939 Roosevelt had signed a bill that changed the celebration of Thanksgiving to the third Thursday of November.

1942 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered nationwide gasoline rationing to begin December 1.

1942 – The motion picture “Casablanca” had its world premiere at the Hollywood Theater in New York City.

1943 – The HMS Rohna became the first ship to be sunk by a guided missile. The German missile attack led to the death of 1,015 U.S. troops.

1949 – India’s Constituent Assembly adopted the country’s constitution The country became republic within the British Commonwealth two months later.

1950 – China entered the Korean conflict forcing UN forces to retreat.

1958 – Maurice Richard (Montreal Canadiens) scored his 600th NHL career goal.

1965 – France became the third country to enter space when it launched its first satellite the Diamant-A.

1973 – Rose Mary Woods, told a federal court that she was responsible for the 18-1/2 minute gap in a key Watergate tape. Woods was U.S. President Nixon’s personal secretary.

1975 – Lynette”Squeaky” Fromme was found guilty by a federal jury in Sacramento, CA, for trying to assassinate U.S. President Ford on September 5.

1979 – The International Olympic Committee voted to re-admit China after a 21-year absence.

1983 – A Brinks Mat Ltd. vault at London’s Heathrow Airport was robbed by gunmen. The men made off with 6,800 gold bars worth nearly $40 million. Only a fraction of the gold has ever been recovered and only two men were convicted in the heist.

1985 – The rights to Richard Nixon’s autobiography were acquired by Random House for $3,000,000.

1986 – U.S. President Reagan appointed a commission headed by former Sen. John Tower to investigate his National Security Council staff after the Iran-Contra affair.

1988 – The U.S. denied an entry visa to PLO chairman Yasser Arafat, who was seeking permission to travel to New York to address the U.N. General Assembly.

1990 – Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev met with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz at the Kremlin to demand that Iraq withdraw from Kuwait.

1990 – Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. agreed to acquire MCA Inc. for $6.6 billion.

1992 – The British government announced that Queen Elizabeth II had volunteered to start paying taxes on her personal income. She also took her children off the public payroll.

1995 – Two men set fire to a subway token booth in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The clerk inside was fatally burned.

1997 – The U.S. and North Korea held high-level discussions at the State Department for the first time.

1998 – British Prime Minister Tony Blair made a speech to the Irish Parliament. It was a first time event for a British Prime Minister.

1998 – Hulk Hogan announced that he was retiring from pro wrestling and would run for president in 2000.

2003 – The U.N. atomic agency adopted a resolution that censured Iran for past nuclear cover-ups and warning that it would be policed to put to rest suspicions that the country had a weapons agenda.

2011 – The Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL. The Mars rover Curiosity landed on the floor of Gale Crater on August 6, 2012.