Monthly Archives: October 2014

Today in History – October 31

1517 – Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on the door of the Wittenberg Palace Church. The event marked the start of the Protestant Reformation in Germany.

1860 – Juliette Low, the founder off the Girl Scouts, was born.

1864 – Nevada became the 36th state to join the U.S.

1868 – Postmaster General Alexander Williams Randall approved a standard uniform for postal carriers.

1914 – The Ottoman Empire (Turkey) joined the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Bulgaria).

1922 – Benito Mussolini became prime minister of Italy.

1926 – Magician Harry Houdini died of gangrene and peritonitis resulting from a ruptured appendix. His appendix had been damaged twelve days earlier when he had been punched in the stomach by a student unexpectedly. During a lecture Houdini had commented on the strength of his stomach muscles and their ability to withstand hard blows.

1940 – The British air victory in the Battle of Britain prevented Germany from invading Britain.

1941 – Mount Rushmore was declared complete after 14 years of work. At the time the 60-foot busts of U.S. Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln were finished.

1941 – The U.S. Navy destroyer Reuben James was torpedoed by a German submarine near Iceland. The U.S. had not yet entered World War II. More than 100 men were killed.

1952 – The U.S. detonated its first hydrogen bomb.

1954 – The Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN) began a revolt against French rule.

1955 – Britain’s Princess Margaret announced she would not marry Royal Air Force Captain Peter Townsend.

1956 – Rear Admiral G.J. Dufek became the first person to land an airplane at the South Pole. Dufek also became the first person to set foot on the South Pole.

1959 – Lee Harvey Oswald, a former U.S. Marine from Fort Worth, TX, announced that he would never return to the U.S. At the time he was in Moscow, Russia.

1961 – In the Soviet Union, the body of Joseph Stalin was removed from Lenin’s Tomb where it was on public display.

1968 – U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered a halt to all U.S. bombing of North Vietnam.

1969 – Wal-Mart Discount City stores were incorporated as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

1981 – Antiqua and Barbuda became independent of Great Britain.

1983 – The U.S. Defense Department acknowledged that during the U.S. led invasion of Grenada, that a U.S. Navy plane had mistakenly bombed a civilian hospital.

1984 – Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was assassinated near her residence by two Sikh security guards. Her son, Rajiv, was sworn in as prime minister.

1992 – In Liberia, it was announced that five American nuns had been killed near Monrovia. Rebels loyal to Charles Taylor were blamed for the murders.

1993 – River Phoenix died at the age of 23 after collapsing outside The Viper Room in Hollywood.

1993 – The play “Wonderful Tennessee” closed after only 9 performances.

1994 – 68 people were killed when an American Eagle ATR-72, plunged into a northern Indiana farm.

1997 – Louise Woodward, British au pair, was sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of second-degree murder in the death of 8-month-old Matthew Eappen. She was released after her sentence was reduced to manslaughter.

1998 – Iraq announced that it was halting all dealings with U.N. arms inspectors. The inspectors were investigating the country’s weapons of mass destruction stemming from Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990.

1999 – EgyptAir Flight 990 crashed off the coast of Nantucket, MA, killing all 217 people aboard.

1999 – Leaders from the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran Church signed the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification. The event ended a centuries-old doctrinal dispute over the nature of faith and salvation.

2001 – Microsoft and the U.S. Justice Department reached a tentative agreement to settle the antitrust case against the software company.

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Today in History – October 30

1735 – John Adams, the second President of the United States, was born in Braintree, MA. His son became the sixth President of the U.S.

1817 – The independent government of Venezuela was established by Simon Bolivar.

1831 – Escaped slave Nat Turner was apprehended in Southampton County, VA, several weeks after leading the bloodiest slave uprising in American history.

1875 – The constitution of Missouri was ratified by popular vote.

1893 – The U.S. Senate gave final approval to repeal the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890.

1894 – The time clock was patented by Daniel M. Cooper of Rochester, NY.

1938 – Orson Welles’ “The War of the Worlds” aired on CBS radio. The belief that the realistic radio dramatization was a live news event about a Martian invasion caused panic among listeners.

1943 – In Moscow, a declaration was signed by the Governments of the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the United States and China called for an early establishment of an international organization to maintain peace and security. The goal was supported on December 1, 1943, at a meeting in Teheran.

1944 – Martha Graham’s ballet “Appalachian Spring” premiered at the Library of Congress.

1945 – The U.S. government announced the end of shoe rationing.

1953 – General George C. Marshall was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

1961 – The Soviet Union tested a hydrogen bomb with a force of approximately 58 megatons.

1961 – The Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved an order to remove Joseph Stalin’s body from Lenin’s tomb.

1972 – U.S. President Richard Nixon approved legislation to increase Social Security spending by $5.3 billion.

1972 – In Illinois, 45 people were killed when two trains collided on Chicago’s south side.

1975 – Prince Juan Carlos assumed power in Spain as dictator Francisco Franco was near death.

1975 – The New York Daily News ran the headline “Ford to City: Drop Dead.” The headline came a day after U.S. President Gerald R. Ford said he would veto any proposed federal bailout of New York City.

1982 – Portugal’s constitution was revised for the first time since it was ratified on April 25, 1976.

1984 – In Poland, police found the body of kidnapped pro-Solidarity priest Father Jerry Popieluszko. His death was blamed on four security officers.

1989 – Mitsubishi Estate Company announced it would buy 51 percent of Rockefeller Group Inc. of New York.

1993 – Martin Fettman, America’s first veterinarian in space, performed the world’s first animal dissections in space, while aboard the space shuttle Columbia.

1993 – The United Nations deadline concerning ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide passed with country’s military still in control.

1995 – Federalist prevailed over separatists in Quebec in a referendum concerning secession from the federation of Canada.

1997 – The play revival “The Cherry Orchard” opened.

1998 – The terrorist who hijacked a Turkish Airlines plane and the 39 people on board was killed when anti-terrorist squads raided the plane.

2001 – In New York City, U.S. President George W. Bush threw out the first pitch at Game 3 of the World Series between the New York Yankees and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

2001 – Michael Jordan returned to the NBA with the Washington Wizards after a 3 1/2 year retirement. The Wizards lost 93-91 to the New York Knicks.


UPDATE: Hillary explains claim businesses don’t create jobs

No need there ma’am.
hillary1

Hillary explains claim businesses don’t create jobs,….yep……..it was shorthand.

 


Today in History – October 29

1618 – Sir Walter Raleigh was beheaded under a sentence that had been brought against him 15 years earlier for conspiracy against King James I.

1652 – The Massachusetts Bay Colony proclaimed itself to be an independent commonwealth.

1682 – William Penn landed at what is now Chester, PA. He was the founder of Pennsylvania.

1863 – The International Committee of the Red Cross was founded.

1901 – Leon Czolgosz, the assassin of U.S. President McKinley, was electrocuted.

1923 – Turkey formally became a republic after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. The first president was Mustafa Kemal, later known as Kemal Ataturk.

1929 – America’s Great Depression began with the crash of the Wall Street stock market.

1940 – The first peacetime military draft began in the U.S.

1945 – The first ballpoint pens to be made commercially went on sale at Gimbels Department Store in New York at the price of $12.50 each.

1956 – Israel invaded Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula during the Suez Canal Crisis.

1956 – “The Huntley-Brinkley Report” premiered on NBC. The show replaced “The Camel News Caravan.”

1959 – General Mills became the first corporation to use close-circuit television.

1960 – Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay) won his first professional fight.

1966 – The National Organization for Women was founded.

1969 – The U.S. Supreme Court ordered an immediate end to all school segregation.

1973 – O.J. Simpson, of the Buffalo Bills, set two NFL records. He carried the ball 39 times and he ran 157 yards putting him over 1,000 yards at the seventh game of the season.

1974 – U.S. President Gerald Ford signed a new law forbidding discrimination in credit applications on the basis of sex or marital status

1985 – It was announced that Maj. Gen. Samuel K. Doe had won the first multiparty election in Liberia.

1990 – The U.N. Security Council voted to hold Saddam Hussein’s regime liable for human rights abuses and war damages during its occupation of Kuwait.

1991 – The U.S. Galileo spacecraft became the first to visit an asteroid (Gaspra).

1991 – Trade sanctions were imposed on Haiti by the U.S. to pressure the new leaders to restore the ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power.

1992 – Depo Provera, a contraceptive, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

1995 – Jerry Rice of the San Francisco 49ers became the NFL’s career leader in receiving yards with 14,040 yards.

1998 – South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission condemned both apartheid and violence committed by the African National Congress.

1998 – The space shuttle Discovery blasted off with John Glenn on board. Glenn was 77 years old. In 1962 he became the first American to orbit the Earth.

1998 – The oldest known copy of Archimedes’ work sold for $2 million at a New York auction.

2001 – KTLA broadcasted the first coast to coast HDTV network telecast.


Today in History – October 28

1636 – Harvard College was founded in Massachusetts. The original name was Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony. It was the first school of higher education in America.

1776 – The Battle of White Plains took place during the American Revolutionary War.

1793 – Eli Whitney applied for a patent for his cotton gin.

1886 – The Statue of Liberty was dedicated in New York Harbor by U.S. President Cleveland. The statue weighs 225 tons and is 152 feet tall. It was originally known as “Liberty Enlightening the World.”

1904 – The St. Louis Police Department became the first to use fingerprinting.

1919 – The U.S. Congress enacted the Volstead Act, also known as the National Prohibition Act. Prohibition was repealed in 1933 with the passing of the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

1922 – Benito Mussolini took control of the Italian government and introduced fascism to Italy.

1936 – The Statue of Liberty was rededicated by U.S. President Roosevelt on its 50th anniversary.

1940 – During World War II, Italy invaded Greece.

1949 – U.S. President Harry Truman swore in Eugenie Moore Anderson as the U.S. ambassador to Denmark. Anderson was the first woman to hold the post of ambassador.

1958 – Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was elected Pope. He took the name John XXIII.

1962 – Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev informed the U.S. that he had ordered the dismantling of Soviet missile bases in Cuba.

1965 – Pope Paul VI issued a decree absolving Jews of collective guilt for the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

1965 – The Gateway Arch along the waterfront in St. Louis, MO, was completed.

1976 – John D. Erlichman, a former aide to U.S. President Richard Nixon, entered a federal prison camp in Safford, AZ, to begin serving his sentence for Watergate-related convictions.

1982 – Soviet premier Leonid Brezhnev condemned the U.S. for arms buildup.

1983 – The U.S. vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution “deeply deploring” the ongoing U.S.-led invasion of Grenada.

1985 – John A. Walker Jr. and his son, Michael Lance Walker, pled guilty to charges of spying for the Soviet Union.

1986 – The centennial of the Statue of Liberty was celebrated in New York.

1988 – Roussel Uclaf, a French manufacturer that produces the abortion pill RU486, announced it would resume distribution of the drug after the government of France demanded it do so.

1990 – Iraq announced that it was halting gasoline rationing.

1993 – Ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, called for a complete blockade of Haiti to force out the military leaders.

1994 – U.S. President Clinton visited Kuwait and implied that all the troops there would be home by Christmas.

1996 – The Dow Jones Industial Average gained a record 337.17 points (or 5%). The day before the Dow had dropped 554.26 points (or 7%).


Quote of the Day

Prepared for Life.

Prepared for Death.

About 6-7 years ago a group of us were engaged in a conversation when one of my buddies asked each of us…”Choose six words that describes you”. I do not remember the six words I chose because the six that my friend chose blew me, and all of us away. I do not know who this quote is attributed to but it is one I try to live by daily.

Isn’t that beautiful?

 


Today in History – October 27

1659 – William Robinson and Marmaduke Stevenson became the first Quakers to be executed in America.

1787 – The first of the Federalist Papers were published in the New York Independent. The series of 85 essays, written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, were published under the pen name “Publius.”

1795 – The United States and Spain signed the Treaty of San Lorenzo. The treaty is also known as “Pinckney’s Treaty.”

1858 – Roland Macy opened Macy’s Department Store in New York City. It was Macy’s eighth business adventure, the other seven failed.

1878 – The Manhattan Savings Bank in New York City was robbed of over $3,000,000. The robbery was credited to George “Western” Leslie even though there was not enough evidence to convict him, only two of his associates were convicted.

1904 – The New York subway system officially opened. It was the first rapid-transit subway system in America.

1925 – Fred Waller received a patent for water skis.

1927 – The first newsreel featuring sound was released in New York.

1931 – Chuhei Numbu of Japan set a long jump record at 26′ 2 1/4″.

1938 – Du Pont announced “nylon” as the new name for its new synthetic yarn.

1947 – “You Bet Your Life,” the radio show starring Grouch Marx, premiered on ABC. It was later shown on NBC television.

1954 – Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were divorced. They had been married on January 14, 1954.

1954 – The first Walt Disney television show “Disneyland” premiered on ABC.
Disney movies, music and books

1962 – The Soviet Union adds to the Cuban Missile Crisis by calling for the dismantling of U.S. missile basis in Turkey. U.S. President Kennedy agreed to the new aspect of the agreement.

1978 – Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin were named winners of the Nobel Peace Prize for their progress toward achieving a Middle East accord.

1994 – The U.S. Justice Department announced that the U.S. prison population had exceeded one million for the first time in American history.

1997 – The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 554.26 points. The stock market was shut down for the first time since the 1981 assassination attempt on U.S. President Reagan.

1998 – The reunion episode “CHiPs ’99” aired for the first time on the cable network TNT.

1998 – Disney’s “Lion King II: Simba’s Pride” was released on video.
Disney movies, music and books

2002 – The Anaheim Angels won their first World Series. They beat the San Francisco Giants in Game 7 of the series.

2002 – Emmitt Smith (Dallas Cowboys) became the all-time leading rusher in the NFL when he extended his career yardage to 16,743. He achieved the record in his 193rd game. He also scored his 150th career touchdown.

2002 – Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was elected president of Brazil in a runoff. He was the country’s first elected leftist leader.

2003 – Bank of America Corp. announced it had agreed to buy FleetBoston Financial Corp. The deal created the second largest banking company in the U.S.